S/V Nereida sails around the world

Day 339 Fri-Sat 6-7th September 2019 Amazing welcome on arrival in Victoria! "Life is precious, make the most of it"

What an amazing welcome! ...  from people on so many boats nearby keeping us ('Nereida' and me!) company and from people on the Ogden Pt breakwater, many of whom had been waiting since mid-morning.   When we neared the harbour, the Fire Boat came out and gave a magnificent water display from its hoses - three streams of water formed a moving curtain of water, and the boat itself seemed often to spin on  the spot - a real pleasure to watch - thanks for a wonderful display!    Later, there was a big welcome on shore after we finally managed to drift  across the finish line, despite almost no wind - with occasional short-lived gusts having frequently given a false impression that the wind was getting stronger. 
 
The day  before had seen a beautiful sail in good wind and bright sunshine down the Juan de Fuca Strait towards Race Rock - with the mountains of Vancouver Island to the N and those of Washington State to the S.   The wind had died again by the time Sooke was reached, so the night was spent drifting - but in company with Bob on 'Duet', who had come out to meet 'Nereida' and stayed nearby all night.  'Duet' left us soon after dawn, by which time I'd managed to get just two hours' sleep and was now trying to round Race Rock in a wind that had teasingly strengthened a little, before heading towards Victoria Harbour, visible in the distance - this time with John and Marj on 'Sauterelle' for company - but in increasingly light wind.
 
More boats came along to welcome us as the day progressed - it was lovely to see so many familiar faces after so long away.  But the wind was determinedly light and mostly from almost dead astern, making it difficult getting to the line.  I seemed to be gybing the mainsail again and again...  But eventually, just before 5pm, the wind came up a touch more and we were able to get closer and closer - finally crossing to a cacophony of horns and cheering ... 
 
I couldn't stop smiling and was delighted to see so many lining the harbour walls and docks .....  Thank you all so much for waiting around for so long and giving us such a wonderful welcome back!
 
The Prince of Whales towboat had on board the  WSSRC-nominated official who took our time at the finish and who also came on board soon after to check the engine was still sealed and had been unused all the way around.
 
Customs officials had to check us back in to Canada - having 'gone foreign', those formalities had to be seen to before I could step onto the dock to greet friends and receive a variety of presents, including from the Mayor of Victoria and from the OCC (Ocean Cruising Club).  There was plenty of fresh fruit to enjoy  and a few bottles to open later.....  All very enjoyable and my thanks, again, to so many for patiently waiting despite the agonisingly slow finish in such light wind.  There were several times when I thought I'd be waiting all night, not managing to get across in daylight!
 
After a celebratory party with 'bubbly' on board 'Trilliant' with friends from the RVYC (Royal Victoria Y.C.), it was a great pleasure to snuggle down for a  long sleep into a lovely soft, enormous bed at the nearby Empress hotel, where I'd been kindly given a couple of nights of guaranteed excellent sleep and good food.
 

2019 09 07 Sunrise passing Sooke

2019 09 07 Passing Race Rock

2019 09 07 Fire boat display outside Victoria Hbr breakwater

2019 09 07 We made it

2019 08 07 Crossing the finish line

2019 09 07 Ogden Point supporters waiting

69643321 10158838191344465 5476377735293042688 n

2019 09 07 Fresh fruit

20190908 142713

Track of arrival in Victoria

*****************************************************
While sailing around the world, I'm trying to raise funds to help support the superb life-saving work done by the RNLI (Lifeboats) in Britain each and every day of the year, regardless how bad the weather. In fact, the worse it is, the more likely they are out there, helping someone in distress - whether a swimmer, surfer, small boat or big ship, night or day, summer or winter, and it is a charity - no government funding - so they rely on our help to fund their intensive training and maintain their equipment.

It would be great if you would take a moment to click on the Lifeboats link here (https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/Jeanne-Socrates2), if you'd like to show your support for my efforts at sailing solo, nonstop, unassisted around the globe, trying to set a World Record as the oldest person to do so, by donating something towards the great work the RNLI do every day. If a lot of people put in even a small amount, it all adds up... Thanks a lot! If you can help, it will be very much appreciated. Let's see if we can reach my target!

(I hear that some readers might need to talk to their bank BEFORE trying to make a donation to the RNLI since many US banks routinely block foreign transactions unless they are notified in advance.)
***************************************************

1900GMT = midday PDT (Pacific Daylight Time) - end of Day 339. We made 79 n.ml. DMG, measured in a straight line between the two 1900GMT positions.

Total distance covered from Victoria, B.C., to end of Day 339 (by daily DMGs): 27,911 n.ml.

Day 338 Thurs-Fri 5-6 Sept 2019 GMT 55 miles to go (at midday PDT) - but wind far too light for speedy progress toward finish :-(

My website (www.svnereida.com) has several tracking/position options - go to the 'Travels' tab for links. Also, the www.QRZ.com page for my ham callsign VE0JS has a Google Earth map showing my track.
Now that we're close to the coast, www.marinetraffic.com will show Nereida's position - very frequently updated - useful once in the Strait of Juan de Fuca and getting close to finishing.
See my website for updated ETA info (top of any page)
***************************

Thursday 7pm A beautiful, sunny, peaceful, calm afternoon, with both Vancouver Island's mountains and those of Washington state clearly visible: Canada to NE and USA to SE. (Almost a repeat of yesterday's entry!)
A humpback surfaces in the distance - its tail flukes lifted for me to see...
Wind well down- Superwind (wind generator) blades haven't turned for a long time, showing that any slight wind has been less than 6-7kt all day - but it's now from W-NW and has just increased slightly - instead of a glassy calm surface, there are now tiny ripples...
Just before dawn, the ebb tide will be lessening in the Strait entrance, which is 19 miles away, and will be 1 kt or less from ~5am on. The tide will then change to a helpful, but not very strong, flood for five hours from 6:30am to 1pm, roughly. The wind in the Strait is supposed to be from W and becoming 10-15kt from midday to midnight.

8pm Decided to get underway early, even though only at a crawl in the nearly non-existent wind. Worried that if I don't move now, we'll not beat the ebb tide when it gets strong around midnight and we'll not make it down the Strait again - as last time

Still a total of 80 miles to go and if we can keep up an average of 4-5kt from midnight on, we'd get to Victoria around 4pm - 8pm tomorrow, Friday ... We'll see how that works out - sounds too good to be true

Midnight Lovely starry sky but not much wind still - sails not filling very much. Coming up to maximum ebb in two hours' time and SOG now is around 1 kt. Heading is just S of due E as we pass into the middle of the shipping separation scheme, well before the Strait entrance.
No moon seen now - it was half-moon earlier with a bright planet hanging just to its SW. Sound of throbbing engines is coming faintly over the water from ships a distance off.

4:30am Wind died, fog came down and ebb increased, so I've spent last few hours calling oncoming ships to make sure they avoid us as we drift with the tidal current,
mainly E-ENE, which took us over the edge of, and just into, the W-bound traffic lane - not a good place to be. Prince Rupert Traffic controller has been helpful, as usual, and as the tide changed to flood, it finally became easier to head on our preferred course of ESE, rather than struggle to keep going in any direction except backwards while trying to keep out of the traffic lanes.

6am Day breaking now - good to see something, despite the fog... Can see about one boat length away and everything is dripping wet. Back into fleeces and a warm hat! Finally able to keep a good course, although still little wind so only making just over 1kt in a W wind.. water surface very smooth-looking. A tug and tow was avoided and another cruise ship 'Norwegian Joy' headed E to unload her passengers - come down from Alaska, no doubt.

7am Beginning to pick up some speed with the flood tide picking up - maximum is in two hours' time, then two hours more before slack water when the tide turns and the ebb starts up again. The worry then is not having enough wind to make way against the strength of the ebb tide. There's still very little wind now but at least the later ebb tide is a lot less strong than the earlier one.

7:45am Fog has lifted - but not the flag (ensign) which is drooping on its flagstaff at the stern. Seaducks are calling again through the otherwise silent air. It's grey and murky ... and very damp... and our speed hasn't got above 2kt still. Kept hearing a whale blowing and then finally caught a glimpse of its back - another humpback. A pair of sea-lions came by, inquisitively.
Time for breakfast - last of my eked-out cereal....and last of my fruit juice.... I made some fresh coffee.

10:45am Passing Duncan Rock, 1.8ml to S. Wind got up nicely over half an hour ago - we were making over 4kt at times - but now it has died right down again - think we might be in lee of Cape Flattery, 3.4ml to S, since wind is from S quadrant. Just went goose-winged with staysail to starboard, and changed course a bit to keep more in middle of the Strait, hoping to get more wind. Only 40 minutes of flood tide left, then the ebb - but might have just enough wind giving enough boat speed to keep going E as ebb increases... Fingers crossed. Making 2-3kt now.

11:40am Passed into Seattle Traffic area of responsiblity in the Strait. Sun beginning to shine. Wind still rather light so we've slowed right down again... Had hoped we'd keep up our good speed for rest of today....
Having a nice, warming mug of soup - it's chilly!

ETA: Looking like early Saturday morning, since clearly won't make Victoria in daylight today - still nearly 60ml to go which would take 12 hours if we averaged 5kt - and we haven't once made that speed yet today.... Need some decent, consistent wind to give good speed. (The weather gods seem to have decided to send their usual light winds into the Strait where we are now, to slow us down...)

DTF: Victoria Hbr (Ogden Pt breakwater): 55 n.ml. (normally less than a half-day away!)

*****************************************************
While sailing around the world, I'm trying to raise funds to help support the superb life-saving work done by the RNLI (Lifeboats) in Britain each and every day of the year, regardless how bad the weather. In fact, the worse it is, the more likely they are out there, helping someone in distress - whether a swimmer, surfer, small boat or big ship, night or day, summer or winter, and it is a charity - no government funding - so they rely on our help to fund their intensive training and maintain their equipment.

It would be great if you would take a moment to click on the Lifeboats link here (https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/Jeanne-Socrates2), if you'd like to show your support for my efforts at sailing solo, nonstop, unassisted around the globe, trying to set a World Record as the oldest person to do so, by donating something towards the great work the RNLI do every day. If a lot of people put in even a small amount, it all adds up... Thanks a lot! If you can help, it will be very much appreciated. Let's see if we can reach my target!

(I hear that some readers might need to talk to their bank BEFORE trying to make a donation to the RNLI since many US banks routinely block foreign transactions unless
they are notified in advance.)
***************************************************

1900GMT = midday PDT (Pacific Daylight Time) - end of Day 338. We made 22 n.ml. DMG, measured in a straight line between the two 1900GMT positions. A lot of drifting, hove-to, waiting for wind, after unsuccessful attempt to get into Strait towards Victoria over Wednesday night.

Total distance covered from Victoria, B.C., to end of Day 338 (by daily DMGs): 27,832 n.ml.

Cape Flattery (~60n.ml. from Victoria Hbr entrance): 5 n.ml to SSW

Position, as posted to www.Winlink.org and www.Shiptrak.org (go to either of those websites with my US radio callsign, KC2IOV, to see my track over this entire voyage):
TIME: 2019/09/06 19:00GMT LATITUDE: 48-27.01N LONGITUDE: 124-38.05W
COURSE: 097T SPEED: 3.0kt
WIND_SPEED: 10kt WIND_DIR: W SWELL_DIR: W SWELL_HT: 2.0m CLOUDS: 35%
BARO: 1017.4hPa TREND: 2 AIR_TEMP: 18.0C SEA_TEMP: 14.0C
COMMENT: Passed C.Flattery, near Neah Bay. Early fog. Wind was up but now down

Day 337 Wed-Thurs 4-5 Sept 2019 GMT 79 miles to go (at midday PDT) - had to abandon Thursday's attempted landfall but possibility that Friday might have useful NW wind..?

My website (www.svnereida.com) has several tracking/position options - go to the 'Travels' tab for links. Also, the www.QRZ.com page for my ham callsign VE0JS has a Google Earth map showing my track.
Now that we're close to the coast, www.marinetraffic.com will show Nereida's position - very frequently updated - useful once in the Strait of Juan de Fuca and getting close to finishing.

See my website for updated ETA info (top of any page)
***************************

Wednesday 4:30pm A beautiful, sunny, peaceful, calm day, with both Vancouver Island's mountains and those of Washington state clearly visible: Canada to port and USA to starboard.
Wind well down- Superwind (wind generator) blades haven't turned for a long time, showing that the wind is less than 6-7kt - and it's coming from astern, so we're running downwind which makes the apparent wind even less, so our speed is that much less also.
The flood tide is just about to start in the Strait entrance which is still 8 miles away. That should help our speed for about four hours - until after 8pm tonight, when the tide will have changed to against us (ebb tide) and will be slowing us down.
Having one of my few remaining cereal bars with a coffee. Breakfast cereal this morning was late and there's not much of it left! One tiny portion has been kept for tomorrow mlrning - but I could still be trying to get in on Friday morning if the wind dies down again tonight...
Still 70 miles to go and unless we can keep up an average of 3kt, we shan't get to Victoria before 4pm tomorrow - Thursday ... Very much touch and go...

We had some noisy visitors earlier - a large group of sea-lions were nearby, playing around Nereida for quite a time - one boarded us at least twice! As I went to see what was happening, he looked up at me dolefully before slipping back into the water... I was relieved he didn't try to get up on board any further - he was clearly enjoying his rest on our bottom step.

A lot of big ships to keep clear of, especially in the early morning, but Prince Rupert Traffic kept telling them of our slow-going presence while we crossed the shipping lanes before entering the Strait.

The pole is hoisted for the staysail, to try to help our speed a little - goose-winged for dead downwind.

6:30pm It's beautifully peaceful and calm still, as we sail along gently under a blue sky. The sun is getting fairly low but is still bright and there are far fewer ships around just now to worry about.
Having a mug of tea with the last but one brownie and two of my few remaining shortbread biscuits, as I relax in the cockpit and enjoy the scene. A group of black seaducks, each with a distinctive white patch, rest on the water close by.
We're going a bit too slowly, unfortunately - seeing only 2.5-2.9kt instead of the 3kt or more that would make a Thursday daytime landfall more likely.

8:45pm Called by Pr. Rupert Traffic - S.S.Legacy approaching, also keeping S of traffic lanes, as we are. We arranged to pass port-to-port and changed course accordingly. S.S. Legacy offered to change course slightly to give more room between us - very pleasant and helpful!! SOG just over 3kt now but expect we'll slow down as ebb increases.

9:20pm Dark... Bright crescent moon over Cape Flattery - its light reflecting in the water, passing high mass of the Cape on our starboard beam, the string of lights of Neah Bay off to starboard ahead... Peaceful, quiet, gliding smoothly through the water... Occasional sound of a sea-lion exhaling - sleeping on the surface? SOG down to just over 1kt.... Seawater temperature has dropped a lot - now only 14.8C/59F.
Moved into Seattle Traffic's area of responsibility in the Strait - monitoring VHF Ch.05 now, instead of Prince Rupert Traffic's Ch 74.

10:30pm SOG down to around 0.5kt - we're making way through water fairly well but ebb tide is effectively slowing us right down so we're hardly making any real progress over the ground.
Having a nice ready-made meal of 'smoky chicken and chorizo' - managed to heat it up by placing its pouch into water brought slowly to the boil.

11pm We're going backwards - having a major problem with the ebb tide - it's stronger than our boat speed with almost no wind - so it's carrying us with it. Heading as we were, SE, we ended up being taken just S of due W - basically getting closer to rocks off the shore near Neah Bay.

In order to keep away from shore, I had to gybe around and head almost NNE, resulting in being taken NW by the tide - a safe direction, although it meant we were into slightly stronger tide and were also crossing the shipping lanes - fortunately, at this time of night, with very little traffic. Means we're being taken further from Victoria - but we're staying safe for the time being, in the middle of the Strait.

I'm wondering if I'm going to be forced back out to sea, to wait for a stronger wind to get down the Strait and to Victoria in safety. It's a pity the ebb tide is so much stronger than the flood tide which would help us to sail E - the direction we want to go in. The tide is still increasing in strength with maximum ebb, nearly 2kt, being around 1a.m.

Thursday 12:15am PDT (Thurs 0715 GMT) The nightmare continues ...! Ironically, I had a call from BBC Radio Solent, to join Juliaan Clegg's Breakfast Show in the UK. I was able to share my present scenario - and also to point out that, in fact, I'd now crossed my outbound path around the world - so I've 'closed the loop' and effectively completed my nonstop sail around the globe... but I still need to get back to Victoria and that's posing the present problem/challenge caused by the strong tide and present lack of wind in the Strait of Juan de Fuca.
We're now making a SOG of well over 2kt, sometimes 3kt, heading W-NW - but it's all due to tide and none due to wind - since there is none!

2:30am Now beyond the yellow light marking the 'bend' in the TSS at the entrance to the Strait. We've been taken 7.7ml by the ebb tide since soon after 10pm - back out of the Strait, just past Cape Flattery, avoiding quite a few ships on the way.

7am Just enjoyed a beautiful dawn over Vancouver Island and excited to see a humpback whale cruise by - dorsal fin shape was quite different from the whale seen the other day. Prince Rupert Traffic were excellent in helping me to stay safe while drifting with the current in no wind among the many ships heading in and out of the Strait overnight and now - many thanks to them for that. We were effectively becalmed but managed to stay in the middle of the shipping lanes, out of harm's way, for a large proportion of the time overnight.

11:30am 'Celebrity Solstice' passes by, 1/2 mile off, on her way back from a cruise to Alaska. We've just reached the end of the shipping lanes outside the Strait entrance, there's a touch of SW wind and we're heading NW at around 3kt, to get a bit further away before heaving to, to await better winds to allow us to reach Victoria.
Vancouver Island and Washington's Olympic mountains are in good view.

 

ETA: Friday afternoon, maybe?? Have to wait now for better wind to try again. If good W-NW wind Friday, that would be helpful and that might happen, according to forecasts, but light winds or E winds are of no use for getting E against strong ebb tides. (The weather gods seem to have decided to send their usual light winds into the Strait to slow us down...)

DTF: Victoria Hbr (Ogden Pt breakwater): 79 n.ml.; Cape Flattery (~60n.ml. from Victoria Hbr entrance): 19 n.ml to ESE

*****************************************************
While sailing around the world, I'm trying to raise funds to help support the superb life-saving work done by the RNLI (Lifeboats) in Britain each and every day of the year, regardless how bad the weather. In fact, the worse it is, the more likely they are out there, helping someone in distress - whether a swimmer, surfer, small boat or big ship, night or day, summer or winter, and it is a charity - no government funding - so they rely on our help to fund their intensive training and maintain their equipment.

It would be great if you would take a moment to click on the Lifeboats link here (https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/Jeanne-Socrates2), if you'd like to show your support for my efforts at sailing solo, nonstop, unassisted around the globe, trying to set a World Record as the oldest person to do so, by donating something towards the great work the RNLI do every day. If a lot of people put in even a small amount, it all adds up... Thanks a lot! If you can help, it will be very much appreciated. Let's see if we can reach my target!

(I hear that some readers might need to talk to their bank BEFORE trying to make a donation to the RNLI since many US banks routinely block foreign transactions unless
they are notified in advance.)
***************************************************

1900GMT = midday PDT (Pacific Daylight Time) - end of Day 337. We made just 3.4 n.ml. DMG, measured in a straight line between the two 1900GMT positions. Into Strait near Neah Bay and back out again overnight with ebb....!!

 

Total distance covered from Victoria, B.C., to end of Day 337 (by daily DMGs): 27,810 n.ml.

Position, as posted to www.Winlink.org and www.Shiptrak.org (go to either of those websites with my US radio callsign, KC2IOV, to see my track over this entire voyage):
TIME: 2019/09/05 19:00GMT LATITUDE: 48-31.94N LONGITUDE: 125-09.81W
COURSE: 078T SPEED: 0.4kt
WIND_SPEED: 4kt WIND_DIR: NW SWELL_DIR: NW SWELL_HT: 1.5m CLOUDS: 70%
BARO: 1014.7hPa TREND: 0 AIR_TEMP: 19.0C SEA_TEMP: 17.0C
COMMENT: Back out of Juan de Fuca Strait, drifting, hove-to, waiting for good wind.

Day 336 Tues-Wed 3-4 Sept 2019 GMT 80 miles to go (at midday) - creeping along...

My website (www.svnereida.com) has several tracking/position options - go to the 'Travels' tab for links. Also, the www.QRZ.com page for my ham callsign VE0JS has a Google Earth map showing my track.
Now that we're close to the coast, www.marinetraffic.com will show Nereida's position - very frequently updated - useful once in the Strait of Juan de Fuca and getting close to finishing.
***************************

Tuesday 4pm PDT (Tues 2300 GMT) "Overcast sky and seas well down, with wind very light still" - apart from changing the "winds very light" to "wind almost non-existent", that entry from yesterday can be repeated!
SOG is around 1-1.5kt, sea is becoming glassy smooth and it's becoming very peaceful with no noise from any wind.
Sea temperature has dropped to under 20C - presently 18.0C/64F - but air temperature has held at around 21C - so chance of fog has suddenly increased.
It's quiet enough now to listen for the tuner to make a 'clunking' noise as I turn on the HF/SSB radio - heard that noise clearly, confirming that the tuner is getting power OK - good news!
Spending a lot of time on weather, emails and chatting to friends, discussing possibility/timing of landfall.
So calm now, think I'll try looking at the backstay connection....

8:45pm Almost dark and still no wind - drifting SE at under 1kt. .. sails doing nothing.
Removed the backstay antenna connection and re-made it - but noticed the wire is very dull inside - film of corrosion covering outside of all the fine strands of the wire. Tried cutting it back but the copper strands were still dull and green - likely to be like that all the way down to the other end. Cleaned up the exposed strands, cleaned and sanded the backstay and reconnected it anyway, hoping for the best - but radio still not transmitting. Seems to me that entire wire needs replacing.
Used a sturdy crate to stand on for the extra height I needed - still not quite high enough for easy access but at least I could reach well enough to do the job as a temporary 'fix', holding on to the reefing lines near the boom end and/or to the backstay for support as I worked. In the calm conditions during the early afternoon, that worked fine, although the W swell increased somewhat as the afternoon wore on. Dull day with slight misty rain.
Had a curious visitor at one point - a sea-lion came to see what I was doing - didn't stay long once it was clear there were no fish on offer!

11:45pm Feels cold tonight. Sea temp is down to 17C/63F and cabin now under 20C/68F. Heading is variable in light wind but roughly E at 1-2kt.

11am Bright sunshine and almost no cloud. Vancouver Island and Cape Flattery/Washington in clear view to N and SE - a lovely day but a pity there's so little wind..... Getting close to entrance to Strait of Juan de Fuca. If we're lucky, we might get in tomorrow - certainly no chance today.
Difficult to do anything but keep an eye on the shipping - lots of it around to keep clear of - including an Australian warship (home port Sydney, they said) exiting the Strait! Think they'll get back to Australian waters rather more quickly than it took me to get here!
Looking like fog ahead in the Strait...

Think I'll be lucky to get any sleep from now until landfall - too much to keep an eye on.

ETA: Thursday...? (Maybe Friday...?) Wind is very light so we'll be creeping along towards Victoria Hbr over today and tonight...and tomorrow... (The weather gods seem to have decided to send their usual light winds into the Strait to slow us down...)

DTF: Victoria Hbr (Ogden Pt breakwater): 80 n.ml.; Cape Flattery (~60n.ml. from Victoria Hbr entrance): 20 n.ml to ESE

*****************************************************
While sailing around the world, I'm trying to raise funds to help support the superb life-saving work done by the RNLI (Lifeboats) in Britain each and every day of the year, regardless how bad the weather. In fact, the worse it is, the more likely they are out there, helping someone in distress - whether a swimmer, surfer, small boat or big ship, night or day, summer or winter, and it is a charity - no government funding - so they rely on our help to fund their intensive training and maintain their equipment.

It would be great if you would take a moment to click on the Lifeboats link here (https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/Jeanne-Socrates2), if you'd like to show your support for my efforts at sailing solo, nonstop, unassisted around the globe, trying to set a World Record as the oldest person to do so, by donating something towards the great work the RNLI do every day. If a lot of people put in even a small amount, it all adds up... Thanks a lot! If you can help, it will be very much appreciated. Let's see if we can reach my target!

(I hear that some readers might need to talk to their bank BEFORE trying to make a donation to the RNLI since many US banks routinely block foreign transactions unless
they are notified in advance.)
***************************************************

1900GMT = midday PDT (Pacific Daylight Time) - end of Day 336. We made 36 n.ml. DMG, measured in a straight line between the two 1900GMT positions. Very light wind all day and night... mostly just drifting, becalmed much of the time ...

Total distance covered from Victoria, B.C., to end of Day 336 (by daily DMGs): 27,807 n.ml.

Position, as posted to www.Winlink.org and www.Shiptrak.org (go to either of those websites with my US radio callsign, KC2IOV, to see my track over this entire voyage):
TIME: 2019/09/04 19:00GMT LATITUDE: 48-28.98N LONGITUDE: 125-12.31W
COURSE: 090T SPEED: 2.0kt
WIND_SPEED: 6kt WIND_DIR: WNW SWELL_DIR: W SWELL_HT: 1.5m CLOUDS: 5%
BARO: 1018.2hPa TREND: 0 AIR_TEMP: 20.0C SEA_TEMP: 16.0C
COMMENT: Slow going today in v.light wind. Sunny. Fog ahead.

Day 335 Mon-Tues 2-3 Sept 2019 GMT Just over 100 miles to go! Wednesday landfall looking possible - but only if good wind ..

My website (www.svnereida.com) has several tracking/position options - go to the Home page or 'Travels' tab for links. Also, the www.QRZ.com page for my ham radio callsign VE0JS has a Google Earth map showing my track.
Now that we're close to the coast, www.marinetraffic.com will also be showing Nereida's position - very frequently updated - useful once in the Strait of Juan de Fuca and getting close to finishing.
***************************

Monday 3pm PDT (Mon 2200 GMT) Overcast sky and seas well down with wind very light still - only ~10kt or so, making for SOG (speed) of only 3-4kt - but that will be enough to make landfall in daylight Wednesday, so long as the wind keeps up.
Finishing my breakfast coffee after finally posting daily reports and checking weather and emails - posting photos with report always adds to time needed.
Looked around on deck earlier and saw the staysail furling line in a complete mess - clearly had not been tensioned enough when unfurled (have had the problem for a long time, due to a broken plastic part). Will furl it in and later unfurl it again, to deal with the line so it winds onto the drum correctly - otherwise, on making landfall, it will be difficult to stow the staysail easily. In present light winds, should be easy for me to deal with.

5pm Whale surfaced several times very close to us - quite a large one! Seemed to cruise along near our port side for a time and finally dropped back and stayed astern. Looked like the same type of whale as seen a week or so ago, all smooth, very dark grey/black, no barnacles seen, with a small recurved dorsal fin - either a Minke or a Fin whale?? About the size of Nereida. (Fin shape made Humpback seem unlikely.)

6pm Finished sorting out the mess in the staysail furling line. Now it can be furled in any time without a problem..
Feeling decidedly chilly now - still a grey, totally overcast sky - no hint of sunshine today.
Have been thinking about the backstay antenna feed-line, now that the radio is not transmitting, and discussed the problem with Jim, WB2REM. Either replace present wire completely with another wire or clean the present connection. If only I had a spare halyard, I could raise a ire as replacement, temporary antenna on that - but all halyards are in use, replacing other lines. That's my thinking. Problem is height - but with no solar panels in place on the stern steelwork, I reckon I might be able to access the backstay connection with a small amount of climbing and tying myself in... It's a tempting thought! Working on the possibilities - must stay safe.
Light beginning to go - time to get some food going - soup and a hot meal - too cold for a cold meal today. Cabin temp is 21.2C and sea temp is 20.9C - almost the same, so hopefully, there'll be no fog tonight.
Wind still light, maybe 12kt or so, and boat making 5kt now. Cape Flattery is 110 miles off. If we could keep going at present speed we'd make Victoria around midnight Tuesday, but I expect us to be rather slower making a Wed daytime arrival looking good just now.

Tuesday 4:30am PDT (Tues 1130 GMT) Wind has died overnight - had to gybe around and get back on course, after easing the mainsheet a lot more, taking up on the preventer and bringing the staysail over to port to go goose-winged. Making 3kt now in WNW wind of not very much. Dark night with very moist air.

Noticing a lot more shipping as we get closer to the Strait of Juan de Fuca - busy with big cargo vessels, mostly heading to or from Vancouver, with some to/from Seattle and Victoria.

Settled on course better now - pretty well dead downwind - not an easy point of sail, especially in light winds. Hope to get some more sleep before well into the busy traffic. Contacted Prince Rupert Radio on VHF 16/74 earlier, to make sure they were aware of us - single-handing and with no engine, only sail... Wind is expected to stay light - hope not too light and we maintain steerage.

6am Almost no wind - wind generator not moving... Still goose-winged, headed downwind, but only making 2.5kt, although roughly on course... Not getting very far just now!

9:30am Gybed the sails - light rain, grey, cloudy sky, wind has veered to SW... Not very much wind but enough for us to make 3.3kt in the right direction.
Had to warn two fishing boats overnight that we've no engine and were drifting under sail alone with very little wind - asked Prince Rupert CG Radio to help contact second boat, which was not responding to my VHF calls. They probably saw Nereida on their AIS so knew we were very close. Both vessels eventually replied to my calls, saying they'd stay well away. Good fishing here, clearly!
Back to my bunk to catch up on sleep.

11:30am Having a late breakfast - lots of dried fruit, nuts and seeds with a small portion of cereal.. and a lovely fresh coffee. Found some flaked almonds, dried blueberries and apple rings tucked away to add in, and still have a ittle mango juice.
Sky very grey and totally overcast. Wind very light and SOG only 2kt, often less but now from SSE so not too helpful a direction. Might increase a little and become more W later today but beginning to throw a question mark over Wednesday arrival...

(Interview with Chek TV just now - will be on News tonight.)

ETA: Very unclear again, now. Wednesday was looking good up to midnight last night, but wind might not be strong enough - looks to be too light just now to make Victoria Hbr during daylight tomorrow unless wind picks up quite a bit ...which it might do... Only need an average of 4kt to make harbour by mid-afternoon tomorrow - but presently only making 2kt. (The weather gods seem to have decided to send their usual light winds into, and just outside, the Strait to slow us down... Grrr!!!)

DTF: Victoria Hbr (Ogden Pt breakwater): 115 n.ml.; Cape Flattery (~60n.ml. from Victoria Hbr entrance): 55 n.ml to ESE

*****************************************************
While sailing around the world, I'm trying to raise funds to help support the superb life-saving work done by the RNLI (Lifeboats) in Britain each and every day of the year, regardless how bad the weather. In fact, the worse it is, the more likely they are out there, helping someone in distress - whether a swimmer, surfer, small boat or big ship, night or day, summer or winter, and it is a charity - no government funding - so they rely on our help to fund their intensive training and maintain their equipment.

It would be great if you would take a moment to click on the Lifeboats link here (https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/Jeanne-Socrates2), if you'd like to show your support for my efforts at sailing solo, nonstop, unassisted around the globe, trying to set a World Record as the oldest person to do so, by donating something towards the great work the RNLI do every day. If a lot of people put in even a small amount, it all adds up... Thanks a lot! If you can help, it will be very much appreciated. Let's see if we can reach my target!

(I hear that some readers might need to talk to their bank BEFORE trying to make a donation to the RNLI since many US banks routinely block foreign transactions unless
they are notified in advance.)
***************************************************

1900GMT = midday PDT (Pacific Daylight Time) - end of Day 335. We made 80 n.ml. DMG, measured in a straight line between the two 1900GMT positions. Very light wind overnight... Plenty of drifting and struggling to keep to our ESE course...

Total distance covered from Victoria, B.C., to end of Day 335 (by daily DMGs): 27,771 n.ml.

Position, as posted to www.Winlink.org and www.Shiptrak.org (go to either of those websites with my US radio callsign, KC2IOV, to see my track over this entire voyage:
TIME: 2019/09/03 19:00GMT LATITUDE: 48-34.54N LONGITUDE: 126-05.64W
COURSE: 104T SPEED: 2.0kt
WIND_SPEED: 6kt WIND_DIR: SE SWELL_DIR: NW SWELL_HT: 1.4m CLOUDS: 100%
BARO: 1016.6hPa TREND: 0 AIR_TEMP: 20.0C SEA_TEMP: 21.0C
COMMENT: Wind backed more - SW now. Gybed mainsail. Very slow.

Day 334 Sun-Mon 1-2 Sept 2019 GMT Under 200 miles to go! WEDnesday landfall looking likely..

My website (www.svnereida.com) has several tracking/position options - go to the 'Travels' tab for links. Also, the www.QRZ.com page for my ham callsign VE0JS has a Google Earth map showing my track.
Once we're close to the coast, www.marinetraffic.com will show Nereida's position - very frequently updated - useful once in the Strait of Juan de Fuca and getting close to finishing.
***************************

 

Sunday 12:30pm Very shifty winds - up and down and varying in direction under grey clouds... Had to come off wind a touch to stop luffing up - wind must have veered a bit and we've been close-hauled on port tack for quite a time now. Speed got up to over 5kt but is now back down to 3.5kt... Full sail still - full main with staysail and small storm jib on removable headstay.
Just seen that the N end of Vancouver Island is beginning to show on my AIS screen - only 120 ml away.

3:20pm Not getting to radio tuner - too heeled over and bumpy in the good wind that's giving us 4-5kt SOG, although (speed) sometimes drops in lulls.
Actually having a good sail in pleasant conditions - often quite sunny, although plenty of cloud.

4pm Even better speed now - 5.5-6 kt, often in pleasant sunshine. Quite a bright sky, with occasional glimpses of the sun in the few blue patches between the clouds.
Weather forecast is for these conditions to persist - pity they didn't set in a bit sooner so my landfall could be a day earlier than planned at present.
If we could keep up a consistent speed of 5.5kt or more, we'd be in by tea-time on Tuesday! But that's just not likely to happen - the timing at the Strait entrance will tell all since, at that point, the likely weather ahead will be known meaning the likely time needed to get to my finish line can be estimated realistically.
Superwind is putting in 4A over the AP requirements - good to have the wind giving us battery power and keeping the voltage up!
Have some sweetcorn still in its can, left over from preparing yesterday's meal, so I'm adding it to a small tin of tuna - plus the usual big dollop of mayonnaise to help things along. No cooking required...

7pm Suddenly, the wind switched off - just died! Instead of 5.5kt, we're creeping along at 2.5kt... There seems to be quite an extensive area of rain off to starboard - the culprit?
Enjoying my last Broccoli & Cauliflower CuppaSoup - nice and warming... Only have chicken soup left now. Good to have alternative means of boiling water and heating food, now that propane tank to galley cooker is empty. Jetboil certainly does that - very fast and easy.

7:30pm Speed is anywhere from 2.5kt to 3.5kt - creeping along again - disappointing!

10:20pm Just spent a couple of hours trying to 'bandage' a fraying steering cable - it had come off the upper guide on the steering quadrant at its end and was rubbing under the quadrant... I've added cable ties in effort to hold it up and keep it from rubbing and fraying any further. A very temporary 'fix'!
Only noticed it because I was trying to get to the tuner to see about the problem with that. The two are close together at the stern and the steering quadrant was exposed on removing the bunk top over it to get to the woodwork in front of the tuner under the backstay.... Fingers firmly crossed my 'fix' will hold out until landfall... a bit of a worry, for sure. Have been busy thinking up a back-up plan should it give way (have cable and bulldog grips somewhere in my spares).
Wind is up and down - now we're making over 5kt, but earlier we were down to well under 4kt
Back to the tuner problem...

Monday 12:25am (Mon 0725 GMT) Finished looking at tuner. Took apart the connection I thought might be the problem, thoroughly sanded/cleaned the metal of the two ring connectors until bright and shiny and put them back together with a tiny machine screw and nut holding them tightly - still no transmission possible. Checked the control cable from radio to tuner - all looked fine. Had to remove a wooden panel for access - have left it open now.
Seems to me that the probable cause of the radio problem is the backstay connection above decks. I can't reach that at sea so it will, unfortunately , have to wait to be taken apart and renewed when I'm in harbour. I can listen without any problem - heard the cruisers on the SoPacNet in Fiji clearly tonight - but that means no more radio transmissions until the backstay/antenna connection to the tuner is dealt with - I'm sad not to be able to use it in the meantime to talk to radio friends as I come close to landfall. I've spoken to so many for so long now that it would be great to celebrate with them by voice!
Time I got to my bunk - need to get plenty of sleep - landfall will probably involve at least one night with little, if any, sleep.

7am Very grey, cloudy sky... and very disturbed sleep. 'Motor stall' error message, with beeping, kept appearing on autopilot (AP) control head display... Had to put AP into Standby and then back into Auto - until the next message came up - often just 5-10mins apart but sometimes a lot longer - all through the night... Tiring! Topped up hydraulic fluid at one point, in case that would help but didn't seem to make any difference. Have also been keeping the AP ram onto the steering quadrant greased regularly, in case that was a problem. We need to get in to give it all a rest - I can handsteer a bit but not all the time. Have been getting some sleep with the AP control in my hands (!), waiting for the next lot of beeping to wake me up...
We're making 4.5-5 kt and wind is up nicely now - as it has been quite often, although there have been prolonged periods when we've been very slow overnight.
Running the generator and charging the computer.
Seeing speed drop at times to around 3kt - keeps varying - due to cloudy conditions? Around 4kt now.

11:50am Feeling a bit better now, after catching up on some sleep. Having breakfast - still have some mango juice and there's a tiny amount of cereal left with plenty of nuts, seeds and dried fruit - more 'trail mix with cereal added' than the other way around!
Eased the sheets (sail control lines) for wind that's now giving more of a broad reach - always satisfying to see our speed increase on trimming the sails better, but only making around 3-4 kt, sometimes less.
Not had any AP 'Motor Stalled' messages recently - either my topping up of hydraulic fluid (or greasing of the ram) has helped ... or it's simply that we're in far calmer conditions, so it's working less hard.
Still have my fingers firmly crossed, hoping that the cable ties holding the frayed section of steering cable do their job holding it together until landfall.

 

ETA: WEDNESDAY is looking good, if wind keeps up ... (Ask the weather gods if they'll be sending more light winds into the Strait, or just outside, to slow us down further...)

DTF: Victoria Hbr (Ogden Pt breakwater): 195 n.ml.; Cape Flattery (~60n.ml. from Victoria Hbr entrance): 135 n.ml to ESE

Plan is to heave to once close to shipping lanes leading to the Strait, if we get there too early to continue on with the Flood tide at the entrance. If present light winds continue for much longer, heaving to won't be needed, but forecast is for wind to pick up later. Coming in overnight Tuesday into Wednesday should mean a daylight landfall in Victoria - 60 miles on, so normally about 12 hours away - but that requires decent wind - only those wind gods know what will happen on the day! We mere mortals can only hope....

 

*****************************************************
While sailing around the world, I'm trying to raise funds to help support the superb life-saving work done by the RNLI (Lifeboats) in Britain each and every day of the year, regardless how bad the weather. In fact, the worse it is, the more likely they are out there, helping someone in distress - whether a swimmer, surfer, small boat or big ship, night or day, summer or winter, and it is a charity - no government funding - so they rely on our help to fund their intensive training and maintain their equipment.

It would be great if you would take a moment to click on the Lifeboats link here (https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/Jeanne-Socrates2), if you'd like to show your support for my efforts at sailing solo, nonstop, unassisted around the globe, trying to set a World Record as the oldest person to do so, by donating something towards the great work the RNLI do every day. If a lot of people put in even a small amount, it all adds up... Thanks a lot! If you can help, it will be very much appreciated. Let's see if we can reach my target!

(I hear that some readers might need to talk to their bank BEFORE trying to make a donation to the RNLI since many US banks routinely block foreign transactions unless
they are notified in advance.)
***************************************************

1900GMT = midday PDT (Pacific Daylight Time) - end of Day 334. We made 99 n.ml. DMG, measured in a straight line between the two 1900GMT positions. Not bad considering mostly in very light wind.

Total distance covered from Victoria, B.C., to end of Day 334 (by daily DMGs): 27,691 n.ml.

Position, as posted to www.Winlink.org and www.Shiptrak.org (go to either of those websites with my US radio callsign, KC2IOV, to see my track over this entire voyage: TIME: 2019/09/02 19:00GMT LATITUDE: 48-46.91N LONGITUDE: 128-05.82W
COURSE: 098T SPEED: 3.0kt
WIND_SPEED: 10kt WIND_DIR: NNW
SWELL_DIR: NW SWELL_HT: 1.5m CLOUDS: 100%
BARO: 1019.4hPa TREND: 0 AIR_TEMP: 21.0C SEA_TEMP: 22.0C
COMMENT: Ambling along in light conditions under grey sky

Day 333 Sat-Sun 31stAug-1stSept 2019 GMT Into September - unbelievable! Mostly very light winds again but better direction

My website (www.svnereida.com) has several tracking/position options - go to the 'Travels' tab for links. Also, the www.QRZ.com page for my ham callsign VE0JS has a Google Earth map showing my track.
Once we're close to the coast, www.marinetraffic.com will show Nereida's position clearly - very frequently updated - useful once in the Strait of Juan de Fuca and getting close to finishing.
++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Saturday 4pm PDT (2300GMT) A lovely sunny day with plenty of blue sky although looks as though some clouds will be coming over soon. Just had a late lunch on deck - of crackers and the last of some blue cheese - very mature!
Speed is only around 2kt, despite full sail - wind is not even enough to make the wind generator turn very fast.
Can just make out the misty outline of the mountains below clouds over Vancouver Island ahead - makes landfall coming up seem that much more real.
Clearing up in the galley and then I'll try getting to the radio tuner and antenna connections hidden away behind the aft cabin woodwork.....

7pm Peaceful, gentle, pleasant... All those... but we're drifting S-SSE now on port tack - just over 1.5kt - not exactly fast - half normal slow walking speed...! Hoping wind will back further so we make better Easting. Very quiet with almost no wind in sails and rigging. Wind generator turning, but rather slowly.
Lovely sunny evening - tempted to have a small sundowner in celebration of seeing land - Vancouver Island's mountains.
Propane supply just ran out to galley - so using back-up camping style stove in lieu - fine for boiling water or heating up small meals but not for frying - so no more pancakes for time being... Might have another tank with some propane in it in gas locker but too busy to investigate just now. Trying to get to radio connections - not easy...

8:45pm On a much better course now - but still very slow - making just under 2kt on a course of 120T. Sun set a short while ago - air temperature definitely dropping and slight dew on deck. Hope it doesn't get foggy - have no working radar, although AIS is a good substitute out here, well away from land.

Had a very nice simple supper of wild salmon with sweetcorn and a dollop of mayonnaise. With no gas to the galley cooker now, even though I have my back-up camping burner, it's simpler to enjoy a cold meal.

Have had to move a lot of gear out of the way in the aft cabin before removing bunk tops in order to get at the wooden panels that must be removed to reach the tuner and connections to the antenna. Having to check back on deck regularly with the wind shifting, to make sure we're on the best possible course, checking weather forecasts also, takes time out from achieving as much as hoped - tomorrow it should be possible to look at the possible problem area - hope it's below decks and not above!

Have been tuning in to my usual Nets - and has been good to hear almost everyone very clearly - they've even talked to me and sent me messages, knowing I can hear them!

Midnight (Sun 0700 GMT) Starry but hazy sky with lots of stars visible and a chilly feel to the air.
Trimmed sails for beam reach - speed increased satisfyingly. Wind has backed a lot now - to N, or nearly so. We're actually headed for the Strait entrance directly now - first time for several days, I think. Cape Flattery is now 280 miles off.

9am PDT Solid grey overcast sky, air feeling cool, decks wet - from overnight rain or dew? Making fair speed in NNE wind, still well on course for Cape Flattery. Should be able to stay on rhumb-line course for the entrance to the Strait of Juan de Fuca from now on since wind is expected to stay in N quadrant. Cape Flattery is just under three days away, although light winds will make that time longer - presently only making 3.5-4kt.

11.45am Wind just came up - now making around 5kt, instead of 2.5kt just before - 'wind under cloud' effect, possibly - lots of grey cloud everywhere. Only problem with increased speed is the increased heeling and banging into seas that goes with it - difficult to work on radio problem just now... Must wait for calmer conditions.

 

ETA: Thursday is looking possible... (Ask the weather gods that have sent these light winds to slow us down...)

DTF: Victoria Hbr (Ogden Pt breakwater): 291 n.ml.; Cape Flattery (~60n.ml. from Victoria Hbr entrance): 231 n.ml to ESE

*****************************************************
While sailing around the world, I'm trying to raise funds to help support the superb life-saving work done by the RNLI (Lifeboats) in Britain each and every day of the year, regardless how bad the weather. In fact, the worse it is, the more likely they are out there, helping someone in distress - whether a swimmer, surfer, small boat or big ship, night or day, summer or winter, and it is a charity - no government funding - so they rely on our help to fund their intensive training and maintain their equipment.

It would be great if you would take a moment to click on the Lifeboats link here (https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/Jeanne-Socrates2), if you'd like to show your support for my efforts at sailing solo, nonstop, unassisted around the globe, trying to set a World Record as the oldest person to do so, by donating something towards the great work the RNLI do every day. If a lot of people put in even a small amount, it all adds up... Thanks a lot! If you can help, it will be very much appreciated. Let's see if we can reach my target!

(I hear that some readers might need to talk to their bank BEFORE trying to make a donation to the RNLI since many US banks routinely block foreign transactions unless
they are notified in advance.)
***************************************************

1900GMT = midday PDT (Pacific Daylight Time) - end of Day 333. We made 61 n.ml. DMG, measured in a straight line between the two 1900GMT positions. Very light wind until this morning. Actually sailed over 67 n.ml. but changes in course with windshifts make for less than that in distance gained.

Total distance covered from Victoria, B.C., to end of Day 333 (by daily DMGs): 27,592 n.ml.

Position, as posted to www.Winlink.org and www.Shiptrak.org (go to either of those websites with my US radio callsign, KC2IOV, to see my track over this entire voyage:
TIME: 2019/09/01 19:00GMT LATITUDE: 49-01.62N LONGITUDE: 130-33.98W
COURSE: 097T SPEED: 5.0kt
WIND_SPEED: 12kt WIND_DIR: NNE SWELL_DIR: NNE SWELL_HT: 2.0m CLOUDS: 100%
BARO: 1013.6hPa TREND: 2 AIR_TEMP: 22.0C SEA_TEMP: 22.0C
COMMENT: Wind just came up after slow progress beforehand

Day 332 Fri-Sat 30-31 Aug 2019 GMT Slow progress again against light headwinds - mountains of Vancouver Island in view!

Friday 4pm PDT (2300GMT) Course has been steady 060T since early morning and sun was peeking through light broken overcast cloud - but now it's a lot greyer and we've had some rain - looks as though more is coming. Pressure has dropped steadily since last night and is now 1007hPa.
Weather forecast shows a band of heavy rain expected - especially over tomorrow (Saturday) - as the centre of a Low gets closer.

Thinking of reefing down a bit more and heaving to - with ESE wind we can only head NW and I really don't want to head N any further.

5:50pm Light rain and grey sky.. We're hove-to and drifting gently SW at about 1kt in ESE wind with boat's bow pointing S - making a slight 'slick' in the water as we slide sideways. Very quiet, calm and peaceful - a good way to reduce stress! I've been getting very wound up with trying to head E, fighting the unfavourable winds we've been getting.
My thinking is to wait for wind from a direction that allows us to head anywhere from E to SE, maybe even S for a short while, before getting underway again. In the meantime, I can look at the radio tuner connections, to try to find the corrosion that I think is causing the transmit/tuning problem I suddenly found we had yesterday.

7pm Light fading and rain getting heavier. Having a chocolate biscuit and brownie with a mug of tea - and relaxing. I've counted up (yet again!) how many biscuits are left - one shortbread and one chocolate biscuit (or brownie) a day at tea-time until landfall next week, I reckon! Luxury!
Not sure where time went, although did deal with some emails and checked weather ahead but I later noticed that our drift had totally changed to NW - wind had veered a lot and was now coming from S-SSE at around 11kt - time to get sailing again ...

Saturday 12:30am Now underway, making the most of S wind while it lasts - won't be long before it backs towards E again.
Good to be headed almost due E at a decent speed for a time! Let out 2nd reef and unfurled staysail - making 4kt, often more - wind strength highly variable.
Must get some sleep - feeling quite tired - have not got to my bunk so far tonight...

9am Had to come off the wind by changing the boat's heading more to ENE around 4am - wind had clearly backed more and sails were not happy.
Think I must have over-compensated in my sleepy state.... Pity, since we could have gone a bit further E without making as much Northing, but we're not doing too badly at the moment.

9:30am About to check weather - downloading fresh files and running generator while I get some breakfast - think I should shake out first reef to speed us up, now it's good daylight.
Wind likely to back further into E, meaning we'll need then to change onto port tack and possibly head SE-ish, although wind might have become very light by then....

10:45am First reef shaken out. Becoming a lovely sunny day with blue sky and thin, broken white clouds - would be very enjoyable if it weren't for the knowledge that we're effectively sailing into a 'wind-hole'... Our speed is slowly reducing, despite full sail.
I can't believe how difficult the wind gods are making my final run-in. Instead of the 'normal' pleasant downwind sail in W, and then NW, winds around the N.Pacific High to the entrance of the Strait of Juan de Fuca, I've had to fight almost every mile of the way - plus I lost the use of my now-shredded genoa in a gale and, for last two days, my radio - so none of the many sociable contacts I've looked forward to making every day.
Believe I'm setting another (very unwelcome!) World Record - for the longest nonstop sail once around the world!! Incredibly, it will have taken over 11 months by the time I finally make landfall in Victoria - Wednesday is looking highly unlikely, so maybe on Thursday...? All depends how close I can get to the Strait entrance (Cape Flattery) over the next few days of light winds, ready for some good wind off the coast there by Tuesday.
I'm keeping my fingers firmly crossed that I don't repeat last time's experience (in July 2013) when I was becalmed just off (in fog) and then within the Strait over 3 nights while trying to complete that final 60 miles.

Breakfast - think I'll make a nice fresh coffee and enjoy it on deck in the sunshine while I pretend I'm just out for a pleasant summertime daysail in good wind...
It's getting so calm as we slow down in the disappearing wind that maybe later I can get to the radio tuner and antenna connections hidden away behind the aft cabin woodwork.....

11:15am Speed down to around 2.5kt and sails not happy...

Midday Clouds have cleared away overhead - and I'm just making out the misty outline of the mountains below clouds over Vancouver Island ahead - exciting to see them - landfall will happen soon enough!!
Sun is sparkling on the choppy water surface as a noticeable 2m swell comes onto our starboard beam from SSE.
Need to relax and enjoy being out here - not many more days to go and I'll miss it all terribly... Put away the frustrations of the delayed arrival and just take in the seascape. The antenna problem can wait for a short while... My coffee tastes good.

ETA: Thursday...?? (Ask the weather gods that have sent these light winds to slow us down...)

DTF: Victoria Hbr (Ogden Pt breakwater): 355 n.ml.; Cape Flattery (~60n.ml. from Victoria Hbr entrance): 295 n.ml to E

*****************************************************
While sailing around the world, I'm trying to raise funds to help support the superb life-saving work done by the RNLI (Lifeboats) in Britain each and every day of the year, regardless how bad the weather. In fact, the worse it is, the more likely they are out there, helping someone in distress - whether a swimmer, surfer, small boat or big ship, night or day, summer or winter, and it is a charity - no government funding - so they rely on our help to fund their intensive training and maintain their equipment.

It would be great if you would take a moment to click on the Lifeboats link here (https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/Jeanne-Socrates2), if you'd like to show your support for my efforts at sailing solo, nonstop, unassisted around the globe, trying to set a World Record as the oldest person to do so, by donating something towards the great work the RNLI do every day. If a lot of people put in even a small amount, it all adds up... Thanks a lot! If you can help, it will be very much appreciated. Let's see if we can reach my target!

(I hear that some readers might need to talk to their bank BEFORE trying to make a donation to the RNLI since many US banks routinely block foreign transactions unless
they are notified in advance.)
***************************************************

1900GMT = midday PDT (Pacific Daylight Time) - end of Day 332. We made 45 n.ml. DMG, measured in a straight line between the two 1900GMT positions. Actually sailed over 63 n.ml. but tacking (zig-zagging!) against a (light) headwind made for a lot less than that distance gained.

Total distance covered from Victoria, B.C., to end of Day 332 (by daily DMGs): 27,531 n.ml.

Position, as posted to www.Winlink.org and www.Shiptrak.org (go to either of those websites with my US radio callsign, KC2IOV, to see my track over this entire voyage:
TIME: 2019/08/31 19:00GMT LATITUDE: 49-06.50N LONGITUDE: 132-06.36W
COURSE: 061T SPEED: 2.2kt
WIND_SPEED: 6kt WIND_DIR: SSE SWELL_DIR: SSE SWELL_HT: 2.0m CLOUDS: 5%
BARO: 1009.4hPa TREND: 2 AIR_TEMP: 23.0C SEA_TEMP: 22.0C
COMMENT: Blue sky. Vanc.Isl. mts just visible below clouds. Wind dying.

Day 331 Thurs-Fri 29-30 Aug 2019 GMT Slow progress against light headwinds; shipping a-plenty

Thursday 2pm PDT (2100 GMT) A lovely bright, sunny day. Heading SE since tacking around just after sunrise (around 7am) in NE wind. Sky is covered in a lot of thin, wispy white cloud - sun shines through without any difficulty. Heeling a fair amount and pounding at times into the wind-chop that has built up on top of the 2 swell - it's always better to be sailing upwind than downwind.
Opened my last carton of fruit juice with breakfast - might just manage to eke it out until landfall sometime early next week, hopefully.

3:30pm Radio is giving a problem when trying to transmit - possibly a corroded connection near the tuner - need to get to it (not easy, especially in a swell) and clean up any corrosion found so the radio can be used again - in the meantime, will not use it on transmit (although can listen) to save it from possible damage.

Having a late lunch before getting to a short siesta - feeling tired after an early start to the day and several checks on shipping overnight.

4:45pm A lovely sunny afternoon. Been checking weather- we'll stay on this tack until winds back into E, forcing us to head more S. Getting to that siesta now..

6:40pm PDT 'Tsingtao Express', container ship headed to US, is due to overtake us at 15kt on our port side in 33 minutes - AIS alarm woke me up from siesta. Later: Was expected to pass about 1 ml off but I'm seeing that distance increasing as she alters course slightly to give more space between us - now over 2 ml. (Took a photo as she passed.
Called 'Ivy Alliance' headed for Singapore at 12.6kt (ETA 20Sept) and asked her (very pleasant-sounding) officer to give more clearance - she was due to pass within 1ml of us - now increased.

Sunset - very nice to see but wind had increased enough, and we were heeling that much more, that I decided to reef down - so tied in first reef as 'Ivy Alliance' was passing the other way. Heel was reduced and speed increased!

11:30pm Wind is veering and forcing a change of course gradually more to the S. Being dark now, having to listen out for the noise of the sails to tell me when to change course, as we are headed due to the wind shifting. We're making a good speed of around 5.5kt.
Time to get to my bunk - with one ear listening out... Likely to be very disturbed sleep with possible sudden wind shift from ENE to S, requiring speedy overnight action to tack around and head E, plus possible shipping coming close as well. We're clearly right in middle of busy shipping lanes between Asia and Vancouver and other points S.

3am Tacked around half an hour ago - we were heading SSE and wind was up. Of course, having done that, the wind now seems to have died down and we're not making the NE course I expected but just E of N - and at only 3kt or less. But the wind should eventually veer more so our course will improve - I just have to be patient and follow the wind around as it shifts over the next few hours.

4:20am Watching 'Great Wealth' approaching, en route to Vancouver. Had to call them on VHF radio to ask them to divert and pass astern of us - they wanted to pass my bow - a dangerous move! - they agreed to go astern, at my request, as a safer move... Distance of closest approach is now expected to be just over 1 mile off our stern. Once they're safely past, I can get back to my bunk.

4:45am 'Great Wealth' just passing astern - 1.22ml off. Immediately, they resumed their original course - 100M instead of the 135M they'd steered on to avoid us.

7am Murky daylight - total grey cloud cover as the light strengthens. Very light wind - Superwind blades spinning but not very fast. Up from my bunk to check on course and shipping but all OK except not making much speed and course is not good - NNE at best.

10am Grey day with sun trying to get through cloud layer. Wind very light still, so speed well down and only making NE course - but better than NNE!

Midday Wind veered a bit more, so better course - 060T... but oh-so-SLOW! Sun still trying to get out.

ETA: ...?? (Ask the weather gods that have sent these light headwinds to slow us down...)

DTF: Victoria Hbr (Ogden Pt breakwater): 397 n.ml.; Cape Flattery (~60n.ml. from Victoria Hbr entrance): 337 n.ml to E

*****************************************************
While sailing around the world, I'm trying to raise funds to help support the superb life-saving work done by the RNLI (Lifeboats) in Britain each and every day of the year, regardless how bad the weather. In fact, the worse it is, the more likely they are out there, helping someone in distress - whether a swimmer, surfer, small boat or big ship, night or day, summer or winter, and it is a charity - no government funding - so they rely on our help to fund their intensive training and maintain their equipment.

It would be great if you would take a moment to click on the Lifeboats link here (https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/Jeanne-Socrates2), if you'd like to show your support for my efforts at sailing solo, nonstop, unassisted around the globe, trying to set a World Record as the oldest person to do so9hr, by donating something towards the great work the RNLI do every day. If a lot of people put in even a small amount, it all adds up... Thanks a lot! If you can help, it will be very much appreciated. Let's see if we can reach my target!

(I hear that some readers might need to talk to their bank BEFORE trying to make a donation to the RNLI since many US banks routinely block foreign transactions unless
they are notified in advance.)
***************************************************

1900GMT = midday PDT (Pacific Daylight Time) - end of Day 331. We made 60 n.ml. DMG, measured in a straight line between the two 1900GMT positions. Actually sailed over 91 n.ml. but tacking (zig-zagging!) against a headwind made for a lot less than that distance gained.

Total distance covered from Victoria, B.C., to end of Day 330 (by daily DMGs): 27,486 n.ml.

Position, as posted to www.Winlink.org and www.Shiptrak.org (go to either of those websites with my US radio callsign, KC2IOV, to see my track over this entire voyage:
TIME: 2019/08/30 19:00 GMT LATITUDE: 48-57.03N LONGITUDE: 133-12.81W
COURSE: 060T SPEED: 3.4kt
WIND_SPEED: 7kt WIND_DIR: ESE SWELL_DIR: ESE SWELL_HT: 1.5m CLOUDS: 100%
BARO: 1008hPa TREND: 0 AIR_TEMP: 21.0C SEA_TEMP: 22.0C
COMMENT: ESE headwind - on starboard tack again, COG better.... Dull, overcast sky.

Small communication problem

A note to anyone emailing me via my Winlink address. Please send any email to me only via the website contact page, otherwise I am likely not to receive your email until after landfall.

Day 330 Wed-Thurs 28-29 Aug 2019 GMT Sailing a fair distance on long tacks in order to make some progress East

Wednesday 1pm PDT (2000 GMT) Dull, light grey sky and air is definitely feeling cold when on deck. Wind still heading us so having to tack to make progress towards Cape Flattery - just over four hundred miles away - with frustratingly slow progress as a result...

4pm PDT Tacked around - don't want to get too far S and wind will be backing soon enough to force us onto port tack again. Sailing close to the wind but trying to balance course against speed - the better the course, the lower the speed because preferred course is dead upwind - a juggling act!

Feeling a bit down because it would have been really nice to get in over this long holiday weekend - but that's clearly not going to happen, despite being so close now, because the weather has just not been playing ball....

6pm PDT Spending a lot of time, as so often of late, studying updated weather info - downloading it four times a day and checking each time to see if we can head in a better direction, in view of expected wind changes coming up.

Feeling quite tired so time for a short siesta before checking in to Pacific Seafarers' Net

8pm PDT Called PacSeaNet but they had too poor a copy to be able take my check-in details. Gave a "Roger, Roger" reply to query "Is all well on board?" which they heard and made do with that... Will hope to make contact as usual tomorrow.

Thursday 5:45am PDT (1245 GMT) "Glorious Sunlight", en route to Vancouver, passing safely 2 ml astern now after VHF Ch16 contact - they had changed course to divert from what was otherwise a near collision course. AIS alarm on our system is working well. Had to call many times before I got an eventual response but "all's well that ends well". Getting a lot of shipping passing by now. Back to my bunk.

10am PDT A lovely bright sunny day. Tacked around to head SE just after sunrise (around 7am) in NE wind. Thin, wispy white clouds overhead - sun shines through without any difficulty. Heeling a fair amount and pounding at times into the wind-chop that has built up on top of the 2m swell - it's always a lot less smooth when sailing upwind than downwind.

Opened my last carton of fruit juice (mango) with breakfast - might just manage to eke it out until landfall next week.

ETA: ...?? (Would normally be expected to take about four days, but ask the weather gods that have sent these headwinds to slow us down...)

DTF: Victoria Hbr (Ogden Pt breakwater): 456 n.ml.; Cape Flattery (~60n.ml. from Victoria Hbr entrance): 396 n.ml to E

*****************************************************

While sailing around the world, I'm trying to raise funds to help support the superb life-saving work done by the RNLI (Lifeboats) in Britain each and every day of the year, regardless how bad the weather. In fact, the worse it is, the more likely they are out there, helping someone in distress - whether a swimmer, surfer, small boat or big ship, night or day, summer or winter, and it is a charity - no government funding - so they rely on our help to fund their intensive training and maintain their equipment.

It would be great if you would take a moment to click on the Lifeboats link here (https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/Jeanne-Socrates2), if you'd like to show your support for my efforts at sailing solo, nonstop, unassisted around the globe, trying to set a World Record as the oldest person to do so9hr, by donating something towards the great work the RNLI do every day. If a lot of people put in even a small amount, it all adds up... Thanks a lot! If you can help, it will be very much appreciated. Let's see if we can reach my target!

(I hear that some readers might need to talk to their bank BEFORE trying to make a donation to the RNLI since many US banks routinely block foreign transactions unless

they are notified in advance.)

***************************************************

1900GMT = midday PDT (Pacific Daylight Time) - end of Day 330. We made 53 n.ml. DMG, measured in a straight line between the two 1900GMT positions. Actually sailed over 90 n.ml. but tacking (zig-zagging!) against a headwind made for only just over half that distance gained.

Total distance covered from Victoria, B.C., to end of Day 330 (by daily DMGs): 27,426 n.ml.

Position, as posted to www.Winlink.org and www.Shiptrak.org (go to either of those websites with my US radio callsign, KC2IOV, to see my track over this entire voyage:

TIME: 2019/08/29 19:00GMT LATITUDE: 49-12.50N LONGITUDE: 134-41.33W

COURSE: 124T SPEED: 4.0kt

WIND_SPEED: 12kt WIND_DIR: NE SWELL_DIR: NE SWELL_HT: 2.0m CLOUDS: 80%

BARO: 1014.1hPa TREND: 0 AIR_TEMP: 21.0C SEA_TEMP: 21.0C

COMMENT: NE headwind, on port tack now. Thin, broken cloud.

Day 329 Tues-Wed 27-28 Aug 2019 GMT Tacking against a light headwind makes for slow progress

Tuesday 2:30pm PDT (Tues 2130 GMT) Sun is struggling, and mostly failing, to get out from behind the cloud layer but at least the fog lifted earlier. Sails are totally slack - moving back and forth with the swell and not of much use in the present almost non-existent light wind. Wind generator blades have been still for a long time... We're drifting ENE - that's good since I don't want to lose any Northing if I can help it... but we're only making ~1kt and rocking gently at times in the slight swell - sea is becoming very calm.

Time for lunch - and will mix up some pancake mix to have with a mug of tea later.

5:30pm Just still managing to keep heading E, but at ~0.6kt or less... Not breaking any speed records, except maybe for disabled snails...

6:30pm Gybed the sails - now on port tack in a very light NNE wind which had veered a lot more after dying away to almost nothing - still very slow but managing our preferred due E course - heading for the barn door!

Found some Santa Cruz Mountains honey for my pancakes - choice was that or from New Zealand and I came across that one first... With some lemon juice .... tasty and goes down well!

It's so very quiet and peaceful when the wind is down as much as it is now. Still a totally overcast sky - edge of cloud layer is visible on W horizon as a thin line of golden light. 2m W swell is very pronounced again - slow and well-spaced with very smooth surface. Surprisingly, sea temperature is up to 23.8C.

8pm Daylight still but getting duller.. Difficult to know what to do when wind is very light and goes dead ahead... Heaving to in very little wind, to 'hold station', doesn't work too well, since drift tends to be downwind, so only option is to head ESE, as close to the wind as is consistent with keeping going while trying to reduce Southing. Result... COG: 105T, SOG: ~1kt.

Weatherfaxes are coming in well now from Pt Reyes on 8MHz.

9:45pm Sails backed with windshift - came back on course but need to change on to starboard ready for wind from E, so as to head more N than S.

10:30pm A lot of playing with the sails needed to keep heading N or E or somewhere in between... Preferred course is ENE. Just gybed around and changed sails over again so we're back on starboard tack with wind from NE-ENE, presently making a course just W of N but hoping to make due N or, if possible, NNE. Expecting wind to veer more to E which will allow a better course to be made.

1am Making 010T in ENE wind of around 8-10kt - keeps varying so speed is 2.5-3kt, occasionally 4kt. To my bunk now but will set alarm to check on wind direction in case possible to head more E.

4:30am Daylight - mostly cloudy sky with a few pink-edged clouds. Tacked around onto port tack - light wind still, so speed only ~3kt but better Easting - making a course of 145T

11:30am Came off the wind a bit more for better speed but only managing 3-4kt in SE direction - Cape Flattery is E from here but headwind from that direction makes it impossible to head that way directly. Will tack around again quite soon, depending on wind - likely to change over the day.

ETA: Mon/Tues?? (Ask the weather gods...)

DTF: Victoria Hbr (Ogden Pt breakwater): 492 n.ml.; Cape Flattery (~60n.ml. from Victoria Hbr entrance): 432 n.ml to E

*****************************************************

While sailing around the world, I'm trying to raise funds to help support the superb life-saving work done by the RNLI (Lifeboats) in Britain each and every day of the year, regardless how bad the weather. In fact, the worse it is, the more likely they are out there, helping someone in distress - whether a swimmer, surfer, small boat or big ship, night or day, summer or winter, and it is a charity - no government funding - so they rely on our help to fund their intensive training and maintain their equipment.

It would be great if you would take a moment to click on the Lifeboats link here (https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/Jeanne-Socrates2), if you'd like to show your support for my efforts at sailing solo, nonstop, unassisted around the globe, trying to set a World Record as the oldest person to do so9hr, by donating something towards the great work the RNLI do every day. If a lot of people put in even a small amount, it all adds up... Thanks a lot! If you can help, it will be very much appreciated. Let's see if we can reach my target!

(I hear that some readers might need to talk to their bank BEFORE trying to make a donation to the RNLI since many US banks routinely block foreign transactions unless

they are notified in advance.)

***************************************************

1900GMT = midday PDT (Pacific Daylight Time) - end of Day 329. We made 27 n.ml. DMG, measured in a straight line between the two 1900GMT positions. Actually sailed over 54 n.ml. in light wind but tacking against a headwind makes for a lot less distance gained.

Total distance covered from Victoria, B.C., to end of Day 329 (by daily DMGs): 27,373 n.ml.

Position, as posted to www.Winlink.org and www.Shiptrak.org (go to either of those websites with my US radio callsign, KC2IOV, to see my track over this entire voyage):

TIME: 2019/08/28 19:00GMT LATITUDE: 48-44.67N LONGITUDE: 135-37.66W

COURSE: 153T SPEED: 3.1kt

WIND_SPEED: 8kt WIND_DIR: ENE SWELL_DIR: W SWELL_HT: 2.0m CLOUDS: 100%

BARO: 1018hPa TREND: 0 AIR_TEMP: 22.0C SEA_TEMP: 22.0C

COMMENT: ENE headwind not helping finish..... About to tack around.

Day 328 Mon-Tues 26-27 Aug 2019 GMT Excellent speed over much of Monday but slowed right down by evening.

Time to switch into a new time zone - geographically, we're now into GMT-9hr but I'll change straight into PDT, meaning a 3 hour (GMT-7, instead of GMT-8) time change due to summertime, so I'll be in sync with people in the 'Pacific NW' (B.C. and Washington/Oregon) and also California.

Monday 2:30pm LT = PDT (Mon 2130 GMT) Quite bright with sun getting through thin, broken cloud layer. Making excellent speed - seeing 8kt at times and averaging over 7.2kt, heading almost E. Small staysail and storm jib working well with full main - just eased the mainsheet a touch. Expect wind to become less and our speed with it at some point soon enough - so enjoying the speed while it happens.

Have spent the usual long time on looking over weather info and trying to second-guess weather ahead and different projected courses and speeds, as well as dealing with some emails - lots more to answer, though... Going to need to have a blitz on that, with lots of really brief replies to get up to date.

About to have a siesta while we speed along nicely. Wind will start veering later.

7pm PDT Light beginning to fade. Was getting more misty in the far distance as the afternoon wore on but nothing much. Now there are fine drops of moisture on the air and a very much reduced visibility - definitely looking and feeling more like fog.

Wind has veered a little and is dropping - we're making ~6kt now and no longer speeding along at ~7kt or more - had to ease the mainsheet for a broad reach.

Enjoying a mug of tea after a good helping of my beans, ham & tomatoes concoction. Not sure what to call it - rather too thick and 'hearty' for a soup but not a stew. I'm inclined towards 'broth' but that's probably just another word for a (thick?) soup. Maybe I should stick with 'thick, hearty soup'?

The time change to PDT isn't affecting me unduly - I'm used to going by GMT (=UTC) anyway for most important things over the day - weather downloads, position reporting, radio scheds etc. Breakfast is usually rather erratic in timing, tending to be, until very recently, after posting the daily reports, and a meal later on has usually been in response to feeling hungry or seeing that it's about to get dark or the sun is about to set, rather than at a set time. Changing time zones so often on this trip has resulted in a lot of flexibility needed in that respect.

8:40pm Still daylight although very dull - a sign of being rather far ahead now in "ship's clock time". Fog seems to have lifted - maybe it will drop down later? Wind a lot less - speed down to ~5.2kt now. Just checked in to Pacific Seafarers Net: 0310 GMT = 8:10pm PDT

Tuesday 1:30am PDT (Tues 0830 GMT) Just finished a long, chatty ham radio session (after some sleep beforehand!) - mainly VK (Australia) stations but also Oregon (USA), New Zealand and Fiji - good propagation around this time on the 40m band. Really great to make contact with so many sending good wishes now we're so close to finishing... Thanks to all of you!

2:30am Wind definitely dying - now only making around 3kt.

8:30am Foggy and everything dripping wet again but, hopefully, will dry out later if fog lifts.

Only 450 n.ml. from Cape Flattery - that would normally equate to around four days of sailing (i.e. arrival on Saturday, if averaging 5kt, which would have been perfect timing!) - but we're creeping along at only ~2.5kt. We've slowed down even more than earlier but at least we are moving due E in a straight line, more or less.

Cargo vessel 'Lord Byron' passed about 4ml to N some time ago, on way to Singapore - ETA is 19th Sept.

Found these position reports amusing - noted today in my Winlink folder. We moved 20 ml in about 7hrs overnight... (and we're still slowing down...!):

TIME: 2019/08/27 09:55 GMT TIME: 2019/08/27 16:48 GMT

LATITUDE: 48-16.22N LATITUDE: 48-17.79N

LONGITUDE: 136-45.07W LONGITUDE: 136-15.61W

COURSE: 090T COURSE: 090T

SPEED: 3.5kt SPEED: 2.3kt

COMMENT: Slowing down - High ahead. COMMENT: Slowed right down - High ahead.

11:30am Enjoying a fresh coffee after clearing up in the galley. Used fresh water from water-maker and water pressure was good while generator was running and freshwater pump was working fine. Brighter now fog has lifted but sun struggling to get out from behind cloud layer...

Sails are slack - moving every which way with the swell and not able to do much in such light wind. Wind generator blades have been still for several hours... Managed to change our drift from ESE to ENE - don't want to lose any Northing if I can help it... Making ~1.5kt - DMG today will not be very good, despite excellent speed this time yesterday onward - c'est la vie! ... Que sera, sera!

ETA: ...?? Tell me! (Or ask the weather gods...)

DTF: Victoria Hbr (Ogden Pt breakwater): 515 n.ml.; Cape Flattery (~60n.ml. from Victoria Hbr entrance): 455 n.ml to E

*****************************************************

While sailing around the world, I'm trying to raise funds to help support the superb life-saving work done by the RNLI (Lifeboats) in Britain each and every day of the year, regardless how bad the weather. In fact, the worse it is, the more likely they are out there, helping someone in distress - whether a swimmer, surfer, small boat or big ship, night or day, summer or winter, and it is a charity - no government funding - so they rely on our help to fund their intensive training and maintain their equipment.

It would be great if you would take a moment to click on the Lifeboats link here (https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/Jeanne-Socrates2), if you'd like to show your support for my efforts at sailing solo, nonstop, unassisted around the globe, trying to set a World Record as the oldest person to do so, by donating something towards the great work the RNLI do every day. If a lot of people put in even a small amount, it all adds up... Thanks a lot! If you can help, it will be very much appreciated. Let's see if we can reach my target!

(I hear that some readers might need to talk to their bank BEFORE trying to make a donation to the RNLI since many US banks routinely block foreign transactions unless

they are notified in advance.)

***************************************************

1900GMT = midday PDT (Pacific Daylight Time) - end of Day 328. We made 108 n.ml. DMG, measured in a straight line between the two 1900GMT positions. Really excellent speed over y'day morning: ~7kt. Great shame the wind died so it couldn't be kept up.

Position, as posted to www.Winlink.org and www.Shiptrak.org (using my US callsign KC2IOV):

TIME: 2019/08/27 19:00GMT LATITUDE: 48-17.64N LONGITUDE: 136-09.91W

COURSE: 086T SPEED: 1.5kt

WIND_SPEED: 5kt WIND_DIR: SW SWELL_DIR: SW SWELL_HT: 1.4m CLOUDS: 100%

BARO: 1020.5hPa TREND: 0 AIR_TEMP: 22.0C SEA_TEMP: 22.0C

COMMENT: Slowed right down - in High pressure... Headwinds soon...!

Day 327 Sun-Mon 25-26 Aug 2019 GMT Light wind or no wind over Sunday. Boom loses its end... Weather ahead looking unhelpful.

Sunday 10:30am Tahiti/Hawaii time (Sun 2030 GMT) Drifting SW in almost no wind. Very peaceful, with just a gentle rocking in the rounded 2m swell from W.

11:15am Mostly overcast sky with a touch of wind from NNE so trying now to head NW and managing WNW - so long as it's north-ish, that's OK! A lot better than drifting SW. As wind changes, we'll have to change with it. Pressure even higher now - 1026.5hPa - has been rising steadily for last 9 hrs from the steady 1020hPa of yesterday.

1pm Sky has brightened and I've had to take my warm top layer off - just too warm!
Just managed to keep going - difficult on a close reach in such a light wind and with swell rolling the boat around. But as I wrote that... the wind died away and we couldn't keep going any longer.
Been busy making 'hearty' meal - beans, barley, ham, tomatoes - works well, especially the next day after cooking - thickens up nicely.

1:30pm Went to have a look at the preventer end on the boom - and, to my absolute horror, discovered that the boom end had come away. It had been pulled up and out by the topping lift (previously the spinnaker halyard) and was now lying on top of the boom with two reef lines against the sharp edge of the boom end metal (maybe that sheave had come from inside - from the now-unused, first reef car, perhaps?).
The boom end part wouldn't budge until after I'd lowered the sail to stop it moving around, having released all connected reef lines, the outhaul and preventer and, finally, released the topping lift to let the boom come to rest on top of the bimini framework which acted nicely as a gallows for it.
Ironically, the very light conditions that led to the problem were now a blessing since the sea was a glassy flat calm with just minimal swell so I was able to work on the boom as though at the dock.
Banging at it with a rubber mallet, as I'd tried to do initially, wasn't needed to help move the end part into position once everything was loosened. I was able to pull the end part back to the boom edge and then over and down into the boom with a bit of pulling and wriggling - not too difficult.
Fortunately, I still had one of the two screws needed to fix it in place from previously, so was luckily able to match it up with another of the exact same thread from my spares.
2:15pm Boom end part back in place with Loctite on the screw threads and outhaul re-tensioned.... Now waiting for some wind to hoist the sail... it's totally silent just now - absolutely no wind at all to move the sails. Pressure is 1026.8hPa - high!

The cause of the problem - only one screw had been holding it in place for quite a time. The other had come away a while ago and I couldn't get it back in place again at the time because the boom end part had moved slightly. It didn't matter then because the outhaul was normally tight and, together with the topping lift, and reef lines when in use, it was actually holding the end part in place. But, in these light conditions, to get more sail shape, I'd very recently released the outhaul quite a lot and the topping lift was loose because the full mainsail holds up the boom instead, so the snatching movement of the topping lift on the boom with the motion of the full sail in the swell allowed the end eventually to come away (held onto the top of the boom by the various lines)

Time to relax over a very late lunch. I was hoping to service the starboard sheet winch but that will have to wait. Similarly, catching up on emails - the boom end took over... Looking forward to a siesta - have been up since very early this morning and feeling pretty tired.

Think I'll celebrate another challenge overcome with a good meal tonight...and now have food ready prepared for the next couple of days.

11pm Keeping my fingers crossed that the wind increases a bit more - we're now making over 3 kt but need a touch more speed to get N enough to find wind to head E before the High moves N and causes us untold complications in trying to head to the finish.

Monday 12:30am Tahiti/Hawaii time (Mon 1030 GMT) Changed course onto 035T after going goose-winged with staysail and sheeting out mainsail as much as possible. Wind SW 8-10kt and we're making ~4.6kt.

4am First light - making good progress - 5kt or more and we've passed 48N 139W.

8am Checked over fresh weather info - seems that the only real option, now we're N of 48N, is to head almost due E now, at best possible speed - so will gybe around to change course onto starboard tack.

8:30am On new course, heading E, making excellent speed - seeing over 7kt, averaging about 6.7kt. Expect wind to lessen later, possibly, and our speed with it.
Time for breakfast...

 

ETA: ....who knows? Totally dependent on winds coming up... In perfect conditions, would be 5-6 days - but that is unlikely to happen, given present weather forecasts of the High in our way and then a Low developing near the coast.
Can't do more than my best efforts, to get in a.s.a.p. I really want to finish!!

*****************************************************
While sailing around the world, I'm trying to raise funds to help support the superb life-saving work done by the RNLI (Lifeboats) in Britain each and every day of the year, regardless how bad the weather. In fact, the worse it is, the more likely they are out there, helping someone in distress - whether a swimmer, surfer, small boat or big ship, night or day, summer or winter, and it is a charity - no government funding - so they rely on our help to fund their intensive training and maintain their equipment.

It would be great if you would take a moment to click on the Lifeboats link here (https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/Jeanne-Socrates2), if you'd like to show your support for my efforts at sailing solo, nonstop, unassisted around the globe, trying to set a World Record as the oldest person to do so, by donating something towards the great work the RNLI do every day. If a lot of people put in even a small amount, it all adds up... Thanks a lot! If you can help, it will be very much appreciated. Let's see if we can reach my target!

(I hear that some readers might need to talk to their bank BEFORE trying to make a donation to the RNLI since many US banks routinely block foreign transactions unless
they are notified in advance.)
***************************************************

1900GMT (= 9 a.m. LT = Tahiti/Hawaii time) - end of Day 327. We made 61 n.ml. DMG, measured in a straight line between the two 1900GMT positions. Drifted a lot before very light wind filled in.

Total distance covered from Victoria, B.C., to end of Day 327 (by daily DMGs): 27,238 n.ml.

Distances (are all Gt Circle, at 1900GMT): Cape Flattery LH (Tatoosh Island): 563 n.ml. to E (add ~60 n.ml. to Victoria); Seattle: 661 n.ml. to E; Honolulu: 1857 n.ml. to SSW; Papeete, Tahiti: 3994 n.ml. to S; San Francisco GG: 953 n.ml. to SSE.

Position, as posted to www.Winlink.org and www.Shiptrak.org (using my US callsign KC2IOV):
TIME: 2019/08/26 19:00GMT LATITUDE: 48-18.89N LONGITUDE: 138-52.29W
COURSE: 093T SPEED: 6.9kt
WIND_SPEED: 14kt WIND_DIR: SW SWELL_DIR: SW SWELL_HT: 1.4m CLOUDS: 100%
BARO: 1024.6hPa TREND: 0 AIR_TEMP: 22.0C SEA_TEMP: 21.0C
COMMENT: Making good speed but won't last! Thin overcast - getting brighter

Day 326 Sat-Sun 24-25 Aug 2019 GMT Good speed Saturday - but drifting in no wind by Sunday

Hope UK friends are enjoying the Bank Holiday (scorching?) weekend!

Saturday 10am Tahiti/Hawaii time (Sat 2000 GMT) Grey overcast sky. Staysail goose-winged for time being to give better speed in very light SSW wind on almost dead downwind course - wind generator not turning, so wind under 6-7kt.
According to weather info just downloaded wind will stay very light all day, probably backing to S and then SSE at some point very soon...
I'm constantly checking fresh weather files as they come available to see if I can change our course for the better but there's a 'wind hole' in the N. Pacific for the next several days and all we can do is to try to get around it as best we can. It will mean several days of little distance gained, if any, towards Victoria.

Possibility that we might need to change course to NE to get further E if we possibly can. There could well be a Low coming in after the High moves N, giving headwinds towards Cape Flattery - talk about 'threading the needle'! Weather forecasts are constantly changing - will check latest now.

10:10am Looks as though we need to gybe onto starboard tack to try to get further E, if possible... lots of 'threading the needle' will be needed in light winds today... By this time tomorrow, we might have light S wind, becoming stronger SW wind, allowing us to head NE...

10:40am On starboard tack now - making 4.7kt, heading 064T. Wind expected to back so will need to change course as and when necessary. Checking weather forecast to see if course OK.

11:15am Heading 084T - will be forced more N soon enough, so making Easting while it's possible. Good speed - over 5kt - but wind getting lighter.
Need to make enough speed over next few days to reach Strait of Juan de Fuca as soon as possible, trying to beat a Low forecast to develop just off the Strait... Difficult but we'll give it a shot...
Here's the forecast:
29th August - 1st September - the High will have moved N and a Low is expected offshore, giving S-SW wind close to Strait of Juan de Fuca entrance - so a headwind likely when close to and within the Strait (making it very difficult to finish then). After that, winds might be light for another day, until wind from NW fills in to allow a finish towards Victoria.
We'll need either to be finished by 29th August (unlikely) or in a good position just off the Strait entrance (clear of the shipping lanes) during that weekend, so we can heave to and wait for the Low to pass by, after which we can continue in to a finish in fair winds. (I'm hoping that Low disappears from the forecasts soon, so we get in sooner...!)

Midday Light rain, grey sky. Time for lunch - chicken soup and blue cheese on crackers..
Spending a lot of my time on weather thoughts and trying to make best course and speed as wind changes, trimming sails ... so not getting to those email replies.

1pm Just saw a whale! Heard a blow and it surfaced quite close by, to port - very dark grey/black and smooth, no barnacles seen, a very recurved, good-sized, dorsal fin - either a grey or humpback - can never remember which usually has lots of barnacles - the humpback?? Means it was probably a grey. It seemed a bit smaller than I recollect the humpbacks being. Waited for a time, hoping it would come up again - but not seen again.
I was up on deck checking on wind direction and sail trim - we're close on the wind, which must be from SE and has increased with the present light rain, so we're making about 5.7kt. There's a slow, well-rounded 3m swell from W. Hint of fog - visibility definitely restricted.

3pm Dull and wet - light seems to be fading already... We're still making ENE close-hauled - going well although wind a bit less so speed now down around 5kt rather than 5.7kt. Have been filling water-bottles with drinking water while running the water-maker and also cleaning around the galley - always an ongoing job.

5pm Foggy afternoon - everything is wet and dripping, with big drops hanging off all metalwork and dripping off the mainsail and boom, into the cockpit ... & onto me if I don't keep out of the way. Need my foulies now. Visibility is down to 2-3 boat lengths.
Having a mug of tea with a rare Tim-Tam (only 4 more left) - always welcome! Rationing my 'goodies' to make sure I don't run out too soon - if having a biscuit, I'd normally have two with my tea - but not just now.
Still managing ENE course but speed has dropped further ... to ~3.2kt in 8kt wind from SE.

6:20pm Just finished chatting to boats in Polynesia - once back in port, I'll miss the boats there and in Fiji that I've been chatting to for several weeks now!

10:30pm Had to finish radio session on 7160 in a hurry - bilge float alarm was going off (needed to pump the bilge!) and we'd gone hove-to - the wind had shifted and backed the sails so I had to gybe us around and then get us back onto a more northerly course in the wind now backed to the E. We're now heading NNE and should be fine on that heading for a time. Will get to a disturbed sleep with alarm set for a few hours' time to check on course and speed - wind likely to back further so will need to make ongoing adjustments to course and sails overnight - hopefully, nothing major before daylight.

Sunday 6:30am Tahiti/Hawaii time (Sat 1630 GMT) Just had to gybe around again and then set a course of NNW in wind that has now backed to NE. Pressure is right up at 1024hPa - we're in a high pressure ridge so winds will be very light for a time.
I was up early with dawn daylight - seems I should be changing my clock time one hour forward to be in sync with where we are now.... but I quite like being still in my present clock time - especially when in fog, as we have been for a time. The fog has lifted, in fact, but it's still lurking. Hawaii and Tahiti sound very pleasant when the sun is hidden in foggy, damp conditions!

8am Wind has died right down and we're not even creeping along - making under 1kt drifting - unable to maintain a course - sails aren't filling and boom only kept in place from swinging around in the swell by use of an inboard preventer. Still a long W swell.
Will grease the starboard sheet winch soon, while it's not in use and I've daylight to see by.
Just found a small sheave lying over the port deck drain near to the cockpit - must look around and try to find out where it has come from... not a good thing to find lying around on deck...
Finished chatting a short while ago on a few morning ham radio Nets, while having coffee and breakfast - 7155, 7146.5, 7192 (Chubasco), 7233.5 (Baja). Hadn't made much contact with them up to now because their usual time was too early for me when I was further W. Good to renew contact with several radio friends that I've known for quite a few years.

8:30am Can't see where that loose sheave has come from - looked everywhere, including within boom gooseneck - one possibly missing there but not in a position where it would be doing anything useful and possibly never there in the first place. Puzzling. Not a big one so can't have been taking a very big load.
Checked weather.... Looks as though we're too far SE to get the nice SW winds that were forecast for this position yesterday and that were supposed to allow us to head further NE...... They're being shown to our NW and we're in a 'hole' going nowhere with slight possibility of light winds later today to help us get further N.... Grrr!

Just furled in staysail, released running backstay and lashed the wheel, waiting until wind strengthens and comes from a more favourable direction - from a S quadrant, rather than from a N quadrant... We're drifting SW at just under 1kt now.

Should get my outstanding emails dealt with today - after winch servicing.

Think I'll make a thick hearty soup - like my Southern Ocean ones - excellent and cheering in colder weather. Putting some beans in to soak ready... Finishing my breakfast - glad I've still some cereal bars to supplement my cereal later next week...

DTF: ....who knows? I certainly don't... Theoretically, just 660n.ml. which would normally equate to 5-6 days - but that's likely to be irrelevant in view of weather forecast over coming week.

*****************************************************
While sailing around the world, I'm trying to raise funds to help support the superb life-saving work done by the RNLI (Lifeboats) in Britain each and every day of the year, regardless how bad the weather. In fact, the worse it is, the more likely they are out there, helping someone in distress - whether a swimmer, surfer, small boat or big ship, night or day, summer or winter, and it is a charity - no government funding - so they rely on our help to fund their intensive training and maintain their equipment.

It would be great if you would take a moment to click on the Lifeboats link here (https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/Jeanne-Socrates2), if you'd like to show your support for my efforts at sailing solo, nonstop, unassisted around the globe, trying to set a World Record as the oldest person to do so, by donating something towards the great work the RNLI do every day. If a lot of people put in even a small amount, it all adds up... Thanks a lot! If you can help, it will be very much appreciated. Let's see if we can reach my target!

(I hear that some readers might need to talk to their bank BEFORE trying to make a donation to the RNLI since many US banks routinely block foreign transactions unless
they are notified in advance.)
***************************************************

1900GMT (= 9 a.m. LT = Tahiti/Hawaii time) - end of Day 326. We made 63 n.ml. DMG, measured in a straight line between the two 1900GMT positions.

Total distance covered from Victoria, B.C., to end of Day 326 (by daily DMGs): 27,177 n.ml.

Distances (are all Gt Circle, at 1900GMT): Cape Flattery LH (Tatoosh Island): 602 n.ml. to ENE (add ~60 n.ml. to Victoria); Seattle: 697 n.ml. to E; Honolulu: 1798 n.ml. to SSW; Papeete, Tahiti: 3933 n.ml. to S; San Francisco GG: 948 n.ml. to SE.

Position, as posted to www.Winlink.org and www.Shiptrak.org (using my US callsign KC2IOV):
TIME: 2019/08/25 19:00GMT LATITUDE: 47-24.12N LONGITUDE: 139-39.03W
COURSE: 226T SPEED: 0.9kt
WIND_SPEED: 4kt WIND_DIR: NE SWELL_DIR: W SWELL_HT: 2.0m CLOUDS: 100%
BARO: 1025.4hPa TREND: 1 AIR_TEMP: 21.0C SEA_TEMP: 22.0C
COMMENT: Drifting in no wind

Day 325 Fri-Sat 23-24 Aug 2019 GMT - Light winds... change of course to get around High

Friday Midday Tahiti/Hawaii time (Fri 2200 GMT) Plenty of sunshine this morning through the gaps in the broken light cloud - very welcome after yesterday's grey and murky afternoon! Warming up so about to take off a thick jumper I've been wearing.

Wind should stay around its present 12kt or so over today but expected to get lighter towards tomorrow morning - maybe down to 6kt, from W still, by dawn.

Boat speed is down now - varying, as usual, with swell but generally around 5kt.

Need to let out first reef very soon to speed us up.

1pm Better speed now that first reef has been shaken out - full mainsail plus staysail plus storm jib now - making 5.7kt in about 13kt of W wind - having a lovely sail!

Seas are up quite a lot - a good 3m from W and fairly close. Sky is overcast.

Checking our planned route with fresh gribs just downloaded - a regular routine, with weather info updated frequently. (Using COAMPS grib files for next two days, rather than GFS, now that they're available - should be more accurate.)

5pm Bad news ..... A big fat High is about to develop across our path E to Cape Flattery and Victoria - I spent an age trying different options on course to steer - nothing would avoid N or E headwinds from late tomorrow except heading due N immediately and possibly for several days, to get around and above the High and reach W winds to take us E towards Vancouver Island - and, eventually, S to Victoria. I changed course as soon as I realised the problem. That means a further delay - just when I was thinking we'd finally be arriving within a week... The good news is that hopefully I've realised soon enough to do something useful/positive about it. Heading due N from here looks as though it's feasible with winds forecast for next few days.

Wind and seas increased a lot at one point this afternoon, so reefed down... Had no sooner finished than the wind died..... Grrr!!

Dull grey skies now, with occasional light showers.

Enjoying a taster of a simple chili con carne that I'd prepared ready in the saucepan for heating up later. Meant to have had it yesterday but left it too late to finish preparing it. So much easier dealing with such things in daylight rather than with the boat pitching and tossing in the dark, with just a headlamp for light.

About to cook some pancakes while there's still daylight and we're not being too tossed around.

Had hoped to have a siesta - was feeling quite tired earlier - but have been too busy to lie down so will get to my bunk early tonight.

9:30pm Enjoyed my pancakes - have now finished the fruity raspberry sauce from Hobart that I've been using so will have to turn to honey, maybe with some lemon juice.

Keeping an eye on a cargo vessel headed our way at 10 kt with CPA (closest approach) given as 3 ml in just over one hour's time.

10:30pm Just finished a busy ham radio session on 7160 - several good chats - some people stayed up late to make contact, being Friday night, with no work tomorrow for them. Nice to connect with Perth area.

Cargo vessel 'Gobal Eternity' passed safely astern 3.2 n.ml. off, at 10:40pm, on its way to Japan.

To my bunk. Seas are a lot calmer with light wind at present.

Saturday 6.40am Tahiti/Hawaii time (Sat 1640 GMT) Lovely bright sunshine, clear blue sky overhead - but clearly just a gap since clouds all around on horizon. Time for coffee and breakfast while generator runs and weather info is downloaded and checked over.

Nice to make brief but good contact with two of the 7155 group this morning - - up early enough today to do so but missed several earlier radio scheds - need my sleep!

Just finished sail trimming for downwind in very light wind, after releasing first reef - well overdue. Speed increased a touch - to 3-3.5 kt.

8am Missing the bright sunshine - that was clearly a break in the light grey overcast I'm seeing now. Having a welcome fresh coffee with my breakfast. Plan for the calm conditions of today is to deal with emails again - still a lot unanswered - apologies to those concerned.

Expecting this SW wind to stay very light all day, maybe backing to SSE at some point quite soon...

I'm constantly checking fresh weather files as they become available to see if I can change our course for the better but there's a 'wind hole' in the N. Pacific for the next several days and all we can try to do is to get around it as best we can. It will mean several days of little distance gained, if any, towards Victoria. Today (and tomorrow), it's actually being lost.

Looks as though we can expect E or SE wind shortly, becoming NE near sunset - just what we don't want....!! :-( The hope is that, in just over a day's time, the wind will start to fill in from from SSW, becoming stronger from SW in 2 day's time...

Later: Just took staysail over to port in light SSW wind - nicely 'goose-winged' again and speed (SOG) increased to over 4kt.

Possibility that we might need to change course to NE to get further E f possible. There could well be a Low coming in after the High moves N, giving headwinds towards Cape Flattery - talk about 'threading the needle'! Weather forecasts are constantly changing ....

DTF: Not possible to give one just now! (Over 810 n.ml.??)

*****************************************************

While sailing around the world, I'm trying to raise funds to help support the superb life-saving work done by the RNLI (Lifeboats) in Britain each and every day of the year, regardless how bad the weather. In fact, the worse it is, the more likely they are out there, helping someone in distress - whether a swimmer, surfer, small boat or big ship, night or day, summer or winter, and it is a charity - no government funding - so they rely on our help to fund their intensive training and maintain their equipment.

It would be great if you would take a moment to click on the Lifeboats link here (https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/Jeanne-Socrates2), if you'd like to show your support for my efforts at sailing solo, nonstop, unassisted around the globe, trying to set a World Record as the oldest person to do so, by donating something towards the great work the RNLI do every day. If a lot of people put in even a small amount, it all adds up... Thanks a lot! If you can help, it will be very much appreciated. Let's see if we can reach my target!

(I hear that some readers might need to talk to their bank BEFORE trying to make a donation to the RNLI since many US banks routinely block foreign transactions unless

they are notified in advance.)

***************************************************

1900GMT (= 9 a.m. LT = Tahiti/Hawaii time) - end of Day 325. We made 87 n.ml. DMG, measured in a straight line between the two 1900GMT positions.

Total distance covered from Victoria, B.C., to end of Day 325 (by daily DMGs): 27,114 n.ml.

Distances (are all Gt Circle, at 1900GMT): Cape Flattery LH (Tatoosh Island): 655 n.ml. to ENE (add ~60 n.ml. to Victoria); Columbia Rivermouth: 690 n.ml. to E; Honolulu: 1736 n.ml. to SSW; Papeete, Tahiti: 3882 n.ml. to S; San Francisco GG: 965 n.ml. to SE.

Position, as posted to www.Winlink.org and www.Shiptrak.org (using my US callsign KC2IOV):

TIME: 2019/08/24 19:00GMT LATITUDE: 46-39.81N LONGITUDE: 140-44.30W

COURSE: 004T SPEED: 4.0kt

WIND_SPEED: 10kt WIND_DIR: SSW SWELL_DIR: SSW SWELL_HT: 2.0m CLOUDS: 100%

BARO: 1018.2hPa TREND: 0 AIR_TEMP: 22.0C SEA_TEMP: 22.0C

COMMENT: Staysail goose-winged.Possible NE course might be needed - checking wx

Day 324 Thurs-Fri 22-23 Aug 2019 GMT Making excellent speed in a good direction over much of the day...

Thursday 11am Tahiti/Hawaii time (Thurs 2100 GMT) Breakfast - at last!
Going to have to finish this trip within ten days - my cereal, already down to quite small measured portions, will run out then! Still have plenty of dried fruit, nuts and seeds though - and there's always the pancake mix which is so easy to use and which I've enjoyed a lot.
Feeling very buoyant just now - we're making excellent speed NNE in bright sunshine with one reef in mainsail, staysail 'goose-winged' (brought over to opposite side from main) and storm jib flying on removable inner forestay (just aft of damaged furled genoa). Frequently seeing over 6kt - fabulous!
Really glad I checked weather ahead - clearly best to stay on port tack since SW wind expected to veer further. Also, if we head directly for the 'barn door', seems we'd end up becalmed again in the next High coming along in a few days' time - better to keep heading more N to keep clear of its centre and in better wind.
Will make as much easting as possible, but will try to avoid those light winds. Might have to make 47N, maybe even 48N, before we can head for Cape Flattery directly without losing reasonable wind - forecasts will change so will work on best route from day to day.
About to open a fresh mango juice to have some after breakfast - two cartons left - just enough!

Found a security ring missing from its pin on a mainsail batten car attachment to mast track - will put some wire there to hold in place - far easier than a fiddly ring and just as safe, if not more so. Wouldn't have seen it if first reef weren't in - it would have been up out of sight from deck level.
Keep finding tiny flying fish hidden on deck - picked up several small to middling ones the other day - a memento of the trip up from Hawaii.

4pm Sunshine has gone - grey sky with total overcast now and pressure has dropped steadily over last few hours to 1017hPa now. Seas are tossing us around quite often.
Making a mug of soup - it's not quite so warm now! We're sailing very well in good SW wind still - goose-winged staysail is working well, running downwind on a course of 035T.

9pm Has been raining for some time and wind has veered a lot more - to W. Took staysail over to join other sails to starboard and sheeted in main quite a bit. Boat speed has dropped dramatically - from over 6kt to around 4.5kt. Was nice to have the speed while it lasted.

Friday 7am Tahiti/Hawaii time (Fri 1700 GMT) Bright, sunny morning - so different from the murky, miserable grey of yesterday. There's a lot of wispy cloud overhead and cloud on the horizon everywhere, so maybe we've just found a small gap - but it's very pleasant and welcome! Pressure has stayed constant overnight to now, at 1017hPa.
Sea surface temperature is 22.4C/81F and cabin temperature is about the same. Wind is from W at about 14kt and seas are around 2m, every 8sec, so it's a bit bumpy but not too bad. We're heeling a little with the beam wind and making a course of 033T at ~5.7kt - quite a good speed.
Time for breakfast - if it stays not too rough, think I'll have some pancakes later on, after my (carefully measured!) cereal this morning.

8:30am Downloaded fresh weather info... Expecting wind on our route to become around 12kt or so over today but getting lighter towards tomorrow morning - maybe down to 6kt, from W still, by dawn - but back up to 12kt, from SW, by mid-morning and for rest of the day. So outlook not too bad...but definitely slower than the excellent speed of earlier today

DTF: 782 n.ml., measured along my planned route.

*****************************************************
While sailing around the world, I'm trying to raise funds to help support the superb life-saving work done by the RNLI (Lifeboats) in Britain each and every day of the year, regardless how bad the weather. In fact, the worse it is, the more likely they are out there, helping someone in distress - whether a swimmer, surfer, small boat or big ship, night or day, summer or winter, and it is a charity - no government funding - so they rely on our help to fund their intensive training and maintain their equipment.

It would be great if you would take a moment to click on the Lifeboats link here (https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/Jeanne-Socrates2), if you'd like to show your support for my efforts at sailing solo, nonstop, unassisted around the globe, trying to set a World Record as the oldest person to do so, by donating something towards the great work the RNLI do every day. If a lot of people put in even a small amount, it all adds up... Thanks a lot! If you can help, it will be very much appreciated. Let's see if we can reach my target!

(I hear that some readers might need to talk to their bank BEFORE trying to make a donation to the RNLI since many US banks routinely block foreign transactions unless
they are notified in advance.)
***************************************************

1900GMT (= 9 a.m. LT = Tahiti/Hawaii time) - end of Day 324. We made 131 n.ml. DMG, measured in a straight line between the two 1900GMT positions. Good to see!

Total distance covered from Victoria, B.C., to end of Day 324 (by daily DMGs): 27,027 n.ml.

Distances (are all Gt Circle, at 1900GMT): Cape Flattery LH (Tatoosh Island): 690 n.ml. to ENE (add ~60 n.ml. to Victoria); Honolulu: 1660 n.ml. to SSW; Papeete, Tahiti: 3795 n.ml. to S; San Francisco GG: 942 n.ml. to SE.

Position, as posted to www.Winlink.org and www.Shiptrak.org (using my US callsign KC2IOV):
TIME: 2019/08/23 19:00GMT LATITUDE: 45-14.19N LONGITUDE: 141-04.04W
COURSE: 034T SPEED: 5.5kt
WIND_SPEED: 14kt WIND_DIR: W SWELL_DIR: WSW SWELL_HT: 2.0m SWELL_PER: 8s
CLOUDS: 95% BARO: 1016.6hPa TREND: 0 AIR_TEMP: 23.0C SEA_TEMP: 22.0C
COMMENT: DTF 782 n.ml. Bright day, occasional sun, light broken cloud

Day 323 Wed-Thurs 21-22 Aug 2019 GMT Genoa well & truly wrapped around forestay so hoisted storm jib on inner forestay instead. Underway again.

Wednesday 10am Tahiti/Hawaii time (Wed 2000 GMT) Grey cloudy sky - just circled around to get back on course after wind dropped more and backed sails in swell... Making NW at 1.5kt or less - difficult to hold a course...

10:30am ....In fact, impossible! We're drifting SW at under 1kt, despite a boat heading of 350T. Best to ignore trying to maintain a course and get on with jobs while wind is down. Wind generator blades are still, showing wind is anything from zero to 5-6kt - so nothing to sail by.

Was delighted to see a Black-footed albatross fly by early this morning - nearly all-dark - hope to see again - they're not uncommon all over the N.Pacific, right up to the W. coast of N.America. I've twice seen one, on different trips, just outside the Strait of Juan de Fuca in October.

Midday Had a very nice mug of fresh coffee - followed advice to make sure it was made using non-salty water - made a vast improvement!
We're drifting SW in light NE wind of 7-8 knots, judging from the wind generator which is only just about spinning. Since we need to head NE and that's clearly impossible, I've furled in the staysail and lowered the mmainsail (actually to third reef). I was hoping doing that would slow down our SW drift but it seems not to have made much difference. Clearly it helps stop wear on the sails, which is good. Part of the reason for keeping the sail hoisted with the third reef tied in is to get at the mainsail tear on the leech there - it needs some more attention, once I've finished with the other jobs.
Another item needing attention is the starboard sheet winch - it's started squeaking so clearly needs cleaning and greasing. Not a big job and I'll get to it after lowering the genoa - that's the job of the moment, now wind has died down so much. Pressure is 1023.7hPa - same as the 1024hPa given for the High's centre in the forecasts.

2:30pm Plan A just went down the drain .... impossible to unfurl the tattered genoa from the forestay... It's too tangled in place around the foil for the material that was torn away from the edges (leech and foot) to come undone. So the forestay and furling gear can't be used now for another sail, as I'd hoped..
Spent a time tidying up the lines around the mast and securing the genoa, its furling line and sheets (control lines).
Bright, sunny, peaceful, relaxing day. Smooth sea but with 2m swell rocking the boat from side to side. Pressure is 1023.5 - so fairly constant - and we're drifting NW.
About to try to mend the lowest tear in mainsail again, while I've access from cockpit with that part of mainsail being close to the boom. Sticky tape initially, running out of Gorilla tape but will use up what I've got left since it seems to be holding fairly well if I use a long enough piece each time. Having lunch 'on the run' - shrimps with sweetcorn and mayonnaise - tasty and it's still warm enough for cold food. Tonight I"ll finish it and follow with some blue cheese on crackers - had been saving it for my celebrations...!

9pm Increased swell from NE rolling us about a lot.
Spent useful time this afternon attaching the removable inner forestay to a dedicated point on deck below the genoa furler drum and then hoisting the storm jib on it, using the 2nd genoa halyard. Added a long strop below the tack of the jib so it ended up raised very high - hopefully, getting more wind - it's not at all big...
Used one long line to make its pair of sheets (control lines), using a cow hitch at the clew. Used the electric drill to add a machine screw onto the track to act as a stop behind the newly-repaired genoa car - now in use to take a sheet from the storm jib. All finished in the last of the daylight this evening.

It's possible that the present very light winds will continue for a short time tomorrow morning - in which case I'll try to add some tabling to the mainsail leech repair I worked on earlier today. Have some material left still but need some time to stitch it in place to strengthen the torn leech.

I also need to grease the starboard sheet winch before we get underway again - might be possible tomorrow morning if I finish the sewing soon enough, although shouldn't take long and is quite urgent so might do it first.

Thursday 2:30am Tahiti/Hawaii time (Thurs 1230 GMT) Suddenly heard sound of wind - from S-SW at 10-12kt - rushed up on deck to get moving - was difficult with wind not so strong and needing to head downwind but eventually we were making NNE - perfect! Never mind if we're very slow still - NNE is far better than SE - where we were heading before!!

Will get some sleep - but fully expect it to be disturbed by wind dying possibly. Need to raise more mainsail but will wait for daylight to do that - safer if able to see what's happening.

8am Lovely sunny day with very little cloud - woke earlier to find us heading due N at over 3kt - great! Adjusted course to head a little more E but was nice to find us heading on a good course at a fair speed, instead of being becalmed still, as was expected as of yesterday ... Need to let out some reefs to speed up more but want to check weather ahead so will do that first to make sure our heading is OK. Downloading weather info now. Greasing winch will have to wait for when not in use.

9am Glad I checked weather ahead - best to stay on port tack for a time. Also, if we head directly for the 'barn door', seems we'd end up becalmed again in the next High coming along in a few days' time - better to keep heading more N to keep away from its centre and in better wind. Will make as much easting as possible, but will try to avoid those light winds. Trying to 'goose-wing' the staysail - seems to be working to give better speed just now - giving wind to jib as well, hopefully.

*****************************************************
While sailing around the world, I'm trying to raise funds to help support the superb life-saving work done by the RNLI (Lifeboats) in Britain each and every day of the year, regardless how bad the weather. In fact, the worse it is, the more likely they are out there, helping someone in distress - whether a swimmer, surfer, small boat or big ship, night or day, summer or winter, and it is a charity - no government funding - so they rely on our help to fund their intensive training and maintain their equipment.

It would be great if you would take a moment to click on the Lifeboats link here (https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/Jeanne-Socrates2), if you'd like to show your support for my efforts at sailing solo, nonstop, unassisted around the globe, trying to set a World Record as the oldest person to do so, by donating something towards the great work the RNLI do every day. If a lot of people put in even a small amount, it all adds up... Thanks a lot! If you can help, it will be very much appreciated. Let's see if we can reach my target!

(I hear that some readers might need to talk to their bank BEFORE trying to make a donation to the RNLI since many US banks routinely block foreign transactions unless
they are notified in advance.)
***************************************************

1900GMT (= 9 a.m. LT = Tahiti/Hawaii time) - end of Day 323. We made just 21 n.ml. DMG, measured in a straight line between the two 1900GMT positions. Drifted in almost a circle!
Total distance covered from Victoria, B.C., to end of Day 323 (by daily DMGs): 26,896 n.ml.

Distances (are all Gt Circle, at 1900GMT): Cape Flattery LH (Tatoosh Island): 805 n.ml. to NE (add ~60 n.ml. to Victoria); Honolulu: 1528 n.ml. to SSW; Papeete, Tahiti: 3678 n.ml. to S; San Francisco GG: 980 n.ml. to SE.

Position, as posted to www.Winlink.org and www.Shiptrak.org (using my US callsign KC2IOV):
TIME: 2019/08/22 19:00GMT LATITUDE: 43-26.12N LONGITUDE: 142-45.86W
COURSE: 028T SPEED: 5.3kt
WIND_SPEED: 14kt WIND_DIR: SW SWELL_DIR: SW SWELL_HT: 1.5m CLOUDS: 80%
BARO: 1020.8hPa TREND: 0 AIR_TEMP: 24.0C SEA_TEMP: 25.0C
COMMENT: SW wind filled in - heading NNE to avoid next High

Day 322 Tues-Wed 20-21 Aug 2019 GMT 2nd reef line OK - full mainsail in light winds, approaching High

Tuesday 1:30pm Tahiti/Hawaii time (Tues 2330 GMT) Had a great two-hour siesta - needed it badly. Now having my breakfast cereal with dried fruit and nuts while the generator is running, computer is charging and water is on to boil for tea. I'll fill a lot of water bottles in a moment - keep the small ones beside the chart table to drink from whenever I feel thirsty and a big one stays in the galley.
Sun is shining nicely, although temperatures are down - cabin is now at 25C, not near 30C any more. I'm about to go and wrestle with the second reef line and 'frozen' sheave. In this fairly light wind, I left the reef half out to give more speed, rather than take it in before my sleep.
Even the line has been difficult to persuade to slide over the stuck sheave - just now, it won't move. I'm hoping to 'work' it if I can, by lowering the mainsail to release the tension in order to do that. Have squirted a load of Kroil around the sheave to try to persuade it to move. Don't want to put too much tension on the leech of the sail by raising the main without the reef line releasing - it needs to come loose.

2pm Will need to lower the sail and try to winch in the reef line after trying to work it by hand at the boom end before the line is tensioned again... Occurred to me that the problem might be inside the boom...I hope not!

2:35pm Problem solved... :-) I'm relaxing over my mug of tea! I was puzzled why there was so much tension at the boom end and none leading back to the cockpit clutch - I'd mistakenly closed the wrong clutch at the for'd end of the boom when I went to tension the outhaul on the mainsail foot the other day.... So having lowered the sail enough to realise my mistake near the gooseneck (boom-to-mast connection), the sail is now raised again, with the reef line having passed around the (still-frozen) sheave without too much difficulty.
Now to raise the sail fully by letting out the first reef - wind is dying, as expected, so our speed didn't stay up for long. Finishing my tea first and then, after raising full mainsail, I'll look at the starboard genoa car - hoping to get that repaired and back in place on its track soon.

Later: Spent some time on the genoa car. Stainless steel screws into aluminium were always going to pose a corrosion problem - but turned out to be not too bad - one screw proved difficult but came free with oil and firm but gentle persuasion... New replacements for the missing end pieces holding in place the long white plastic strips, acting as 'runners' on the track, were screwed into position. Tomorrow, the car needs to be fixed in place as a stop at the aft end of the genoa car track - either with a sturdy machine screw or being held by strong cord. (Useful to have an electric cordless drill on board!) The original machine screw sheared off so that will be left alone since it cannot easily be dealt with but fortunately it does not prevent the car from being slid into place over the track.

Very much enjoyed my evening meal of (wild) salmon and sweetcorn with mayonnaise - simple and appropriate. I'd decided it was not cold enough for a hot main meal, having started to prepare it in the warmth of the sunny afternoon...

9pm Finished most of evening radio sessions - having to change band for contact with several places (California/Oregon/B.C.) since they're now in 'skip' zone for 20m, but 40m is working fine. 20m is still working well for Australia.
Boat speed is now well down - around 2.5kt in dying wind... Just about keeping on course, which has been adjusted to 072T at present, but that will almost certainly change overnight if wind veers more and dies away, as expected. Pressure is now up to 1017hPa - has risen 2hPa/3hrs over the last 9hrs and is expected to increase as we get close to centre of High pressure cell quite soon.

My plan for tomorrow depends very much on being in calm conditions if genoa is to be removed from its foil and replaced by a second (small) staysail, to add in to available sail area.

Wednesday 1:45am Tahiti/Hawaii time (Wed 1145 GMT) I've been very surprised by our speed this evening, often seeing around 5kt, even 6kt at times... Must be cloudy and we're getting frequent increased wind under clouds. The wind has been slowly veering, so I've had to adjust our heading slowly - now due E although our COG has been mostly rather N of E (current?) and only now are we actually making a COG of almost due E. I'll be interested to see how the unexpected increased speed affects our DMG by morning. Expecting light headwinds over the coming daytime.

7am Bright day with 90% broken light cloud layer. Gybed around in veered wind - now coming from NE. We're making around 4kt on a COG of 007T, close-hauled with (small) staysail and full mainsail. Wind stronger than was indicated by forecasts - expected it to be a lot lighter by now. Pressure has risen 2hPa in last three hours - to 1021hPa.

8am Amazingly, wind seems to have dropped a lot since gybing around - just when I was hoping we'd make some good northing. Now only making about 2kt on 008T in wind of maybe 8kt - wind generator blades just about turning, despite heading upwind... Pressure now 1022hPa.
Spoke to 'Zoomac' on PolyMagNet - great still to be talking daily to boats in Polynesia and Fiji! (Had useful advice from Andrew on 'Eye Candy' last night.)
Clouds have virtually cleared away - blue sky overhead and thin wispy cloud layer on horizon all around. Seems we're in the light winds of the High pressure cell - expected to last for about a day, so little progress will be made over that time but, hopefully, we can keep heading N-NE while doing some boat jobs.
Hearing gurgling of water against the hull as we sail on slowly ... Time for breakfast while preparing 9am/1900GMT reports for posting.

 

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While sailing around the world, I'm trying to raise funds to help support the superb life-saving work done by the RNLI (Lifeboats) in Britain each and every day of the year, regardless how bad the weather. In fact, the worse it is, the more likely they are out there, helping someone in distress - whether a swimmer, surfer, small boat or big ship, night or day, summer or winter, and it is a charity - no government funding - so they rely on our help to fund their intensive training and maintain their equipment.

It would be great if you would take a moment to click on the Lifeboats link here (https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/Jeanne-Socrates2), if you'd like to show your support for my efforts at sailing solo, nonstop, unassisted around the globe, trying to set a World Record as the oldest person to do so, by donating something towards the great work the RNLI do every day. If a lot of people put in even a small amount, it all adds up... Thanks a lot! If you can help, it will be very much appreciated. Let's see if we can reach my target!

(I hear that some readers might need to talk to their bank BEFORE trying to make a donation to the RNLI since many US banks routinely block foreign transactions unless
they are notified in advance.)
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1900GMT (= 9 a.m. LT = Tahiti/Hawaii time) - end of Day 322. We made 72 n.ml. DMG, measured in a straight line between the two 1900GMT positions.

Total distance covered from Victoria, B.C., to end of Day 322 (by daily DMGs): 26,875 n.ml.

Distances (are all Gt Circle, at 1900GMT): Cape Flattery LH (Tatoosh Island): 819 n.ml. to NE (add ~60 n.ml. to Victoria); Honolulu: 1509 n.ml. to SSW; Papeete, Tahiti: 3657 n.ml. to S; San Francisco GG: 979 n.ml. to SE.

Position, as posted to www.Winlink.org and www.Shiptrak.org (using my US callsign KC2IOV):
TIME: 2019/08/21 19:00GMT LATITUDE: 43-05.50N LONGITUDE: 142-50.36W
COURSE: 002T SPEED: 2.3kt
WIND_SPEED: 8kt WIND_DIR: ENE SWELL_DIR: NNE SWELL_HT: 1.5m CLOUDS: 60%
BARO: 1022.6hPa TREND: 2 AIR_TEMP: 24.0C SEA_TEMP: 26.0C
COMMENT: In High pressure cell, slow day today...